How to Train Like a Champion

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Things are hopping faster than 37 jackalopes
today - so let's get right into the important
stuff!

1. The Dinosaur Files

The February issue of the Dinosaur Files is
almost ready to go - with some great new
features - so be looking for an email with
the links very soon.

In the meantime, if you missed the January
issue, grab it now. It's available in PDF, KIndle
or (something new) a printed edition mailed
to you directly by Amazon:

PDF edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

Amazon hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017hardcopy.html

2. The Complete List

We have 22 books and courses in the
Kindle bookstore now. Here's the
complete list:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

Even if you have the books in hard copy
or in e-book format, go over to the Kindle
pages and rank the reviews. Ranking the
reviews helps newbies choose Dino
Training over muscle pumping
silliness.

And, of course, feel free to post a
review of your own. They really
help us.

3. How to Train Like a Champion

And now, let's talk training -- as in,
real world, championship training.

Back in 1952, a young man named Tom
was working as a cook in the army. He
was based in California and was slated
to be sent to Korea.

He thought he would probably die in Korea,
because this was during the Korean War,
and the North Koreans were using US
Army cooks for target practice.

They figured that they'd demoralize the
Americans by shooting all their cooks.

So Tom practiced his cooking -- and his
shooting. By then, all the cooks in the
army were carrying rifles while they did
their cooking.

But he also practiced something else.

Weightlifting.

And he was pretty darn good at it.

Good enough to win the USA National
championships and qualify for the 1952
Olympic Games in Helsinki.

So instead of going to Korea, Tom went
to the Olympics -- where he won a gold
medal.

Yes, I'm talking about Tommy Kono -- one
of the greatest weightlifters of all time.

But here's the important thing.

Tommy Kono had very limited time for
training. The Army didn't let him train
all day. He had to do his regular Army
job and Army PT and everything else a
soldier does.

So he developed something he called
Quality Training.

He trained just 3 or 4 times a week for no
more than 90 minutes per workout.

But he made every minute count.

He focused on squats, front squats, military
presses, squat cleans, squat snatches and
jerks.

He didn't do anything else because he didn't
have time to do anything else. He focused on
the important stuff -- and he trained it very,
very hard.

He coupled that with unshakable, iron
determination to be the best in the world.

And when he trained, he trained with zen-like
powers of concentration.

And it worked. He ended up winning six World
Championships, three Pan-American titles,
two Olympic gold medals and an Olympic
silver medal.

He set official World records in four different
weight classes: 148, 165, 181 and 198.

Tommy Kono proved that Quality Training
works.

You can do the very same thing. Follow the
abbreviated and ultra-abbreviated training
programs in my books and courses -- train
with focus and passion -- and the results will
astonish you.

As always, thanks for reading and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 1, gives you
some terrific abbreviated and ultra-abbreviated
workouts -- and tons of other great tips about
championship training:

Hard copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

Kindle e-book

http://brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets01_kindle.html

PDF

See the links to PDF books and courses at our
products page:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "When you train,
train
like a champion." -- Brooks Kubik

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Bench Press Alternatives for Dinos

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We have a ton to cover this morning,
so let's get started - beginning with an
update on The Dino Files.

1. The January Dino Files

The January Dino Files is available
in Kindle and PDF editions - AND in a
hard-copy edition printed and shipped
to you by Amazon.

PDF edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

Amazon hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017hardcopy.html

We're finishing up the February issue and will
release the PDF very soon. It's going to be
another great issue - with some special new
features and upgrades that I think you're
really going to like.

2. The Complete List

We have over 20 books in the Kindle book-
store now. Here's the complete list:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

3. Bench Press Alternatives for
Dinos


Several readers have asked about bench
press alternatives for Dinos who train
alone, without a spotter and without
a power rack.

It's a good question because doing bench
presses without a spotter and without a
power rack is a bad idea - as in, you can
literally die under the bar if you get stuck
with a heavy weight.

And I'm not making this up. At least once a
year there's a newspaper report from some-
where about someone who got pinned under
 a heavy barbell while training bench presses
on his own - and he died.

So what are the options?

One obvious possibility is the parallel
bar dip. However, I would stay away
from these. They can be very tough
on the shoulders. That's especially
true if you do them on wide dipping
bars or if you pile on plenty of extra
weight.

Having said that, I know that some of you
do dips, enjoy them, and have no problem
with them. If they work for you, then feel
free to do them, but do them the RIGHT
way. Avoid a deep stretch, and don't do
any sort of drop and bounce stuff.

Also, some Dinos do much better with
ring dips than parallel bar dips. But
again, avoid the deep stretch!

Here are some other, and in my opinion,
much better options. Of course, you
would only use ONE of these in any
particular training program:

1. Dumbbell Bench Presses

These are great, and many trainees
find that they actually work the chest
muscles harder than regular bench
presses.

Don't lower the dumbbells any further
than you would lower the barbell. A
deep stretch can hurt your shoulders.

2. Dumbbell Incline Presses

These were a favorite of many top
bodybuilders from the 1940s and 1950s.
Reg Park, Clarence Ross, Steve Reeves,
Alan Stephan and George Eiferman all
did plenty of dumbbell incline presses.

Note that you can use different angles.

Some dinos prefer a 30 degree angle,
others a 45 degree angle, and others
a 60 degree angle.

3. Dumbbell Floor Presses

Charles Smith covered these in an old
issue of Muscle Power magazine back
in the 1950s. It's a good exercise, and
with practice, you can go pretty heavy.

Resist the temptation to bounce your
upper arms and elbows off the floor
to use more weight or do more reps.
That's cheating, and it's a good way to
hurt yourself.

4. Barbell Floor Presses

Of course, you do these with plates
large enough that you can roll the bar
into the starting position and then roll
it back out when you are finished with
your set. You don't want to get stuck
under a heavy barbell.

Again, resist the temptation to bounce
the upper arms and elbows off the floor.
Some Dinos find that floor presses are
easier on their shoulders than bench
presses are -- but others (I'm one of
them) find the reverse to be true. So
start light and work up slowly until you
are sure the exercise will be okay
for you.

5. One Arm Dumbbell Bench Presses

These are a very good exercise -- and a
very tough one. It's hard to balance the
dumbbell and stay in position on the
bench. You actually get a good *core*
(I hate that word) workout when you
do these.

These are a good exercise if you have
trouble getting two dumbbells into the
starting position for the two dumbbell
bench press.

6. One Arm Dumbbell Incline Press

Again, this is a good exercise if your
problem is wrestling a pair of heavy
dumbbells into the starting position
for the two dumbbell version of the
exercise.

Remember to experiment with different
angles!

7. Pushups

See Dinosaur Bodyweight training for
dozens of super-effective pushup variations,
including some killer pushups with rings:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_bodyweight.html

Also, note that you can add resistance
with heavy bands or by putting a barbell
plate or a sandbag on your upper back.

Pro wrestling great Bruno Sammartino
famously did a pushup with 600-pound
wrestler Haystacks Calhoun sitting on
his upper back and shoulders. That
might be an all-time record in weighted
pushups.

So there you have it: seven terrific
alternatives to the regular bench
press. Give them a try!

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Dinosaur Training started a strength training
revolution when I published the little monster way
in 1996 - and it's been a best seller ever since:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_training.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are right
here at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Where there's
a will, there's a way -- and where there's a
way, strength and muscle lies ahead."
-- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

Seven Rules for Lifelong Strength and Health

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk
iron.

1. The January Dino Files

The January Dino Files is available
in Kindle and PDF editions - AND in a
hard-copy edition printed and shipped
to you by Amazon.

PDF edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

Amazon hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017hardcopy.html

2. The February Dino Files

Is almost ready, and it's going to come
to you with something new and different.

It's a special kind of bonus.

Actually, three of them.

Be looking for it. It's going to be lots
of fun. And it's going to make the
Dino Files better than ever.

3. Seven Keys to Lifelong Strength
and Health

I was talking with a friend and fellow
Dinosaur the other day. He's about my
age (I'm 60), and like me, he's been
training for pretty much his entire
life.

He's in excellent shape, and he looks
*much* younger than his age.

And that's true of many lifelong Iron
Slingers.

But it doesn't happen by accident. It
happens by living what Bob Hoffman
called "the Strength and Health lifestyle."

In other words, it's the result of eating
the right way -- and training the right
way -- and (very important) keeping
your weight under control.

Anyhow, we talked about those topics
a bit, and I thought I'd share some of
what we covered. So here are seven
rules for lifelong strength and health:

1. Follow a Dino-style strength
training
program.

a. More than any other form of exercise,
progressive resistance training helps keep
you young and healthy -- in part because
strength training helps you maintain
healthy hormone levels as you grow
older.

b. Cardio training helps (if it's the right
kind of cardio training), and so does
stretching and what they now call
"mobility" work -- but progressive
resistance training is far and away
the most important thing to do.

2. Follow a training program that
you
enjoy.

a. If you don't enjoy your workouts, you
won't keep doing them.

b. If you like kettlebells, use kettlebells.
If you prefer to use barbells, use barbells.
If you would rather do bodyweight training,
do bodyweight training. If you prefer to mix
things, up, that's fine, too.

c. No one type of training is "best." What's
best for YOU is what you enjoy doing. That
varies from person to person, and it may
change for you over time.

d. If you are a mature trainee, you have
earned the right to have FUN when you
train.

3. Train hard, but train smart.

a. Older trainees need to listen to their
bodies. There's a time to push hard, and
a time to ease up a bit.

b. See Gray Hair and Black Iron for advice
on sensible and effective training programs
for older Dinos. It gives you over 50 of them.

4. If it hurts, don't do it.

a. You'd be surprised how many trainees
ignore this rule.

b. Things that work great at age 20 or 30
may be very bad for you at age 50 or 60.

c. Dings and dents may require work-
arounds and/or different exercises.

5. Pay attention to rest, recovery and
recuperation.

a. If you don't recover from your workouts,
they will gradually wear you down, not build
you up.

b. Get enough sleep every night. Your body
rebuilds and recharges itself while you are
sleeping.

6. Pay attention to diet and nutrition.

a. When you're young, you can eat almost
anything and get away with it. Things are
different for older trainees.

b. See Knife, Fork, Muscle for more information
about diet and nutrition for lifelong strength and
health.

7. Keep your weight under control.

a. You don't need to walk around flashing your
six-pack -- or posting six-pack selfies on Face-
book -- but you do need to keep your gut under
control.

b. Excess stomach fat is linked to a whole host
of health problems, including diabetes and
heart disease.

c. The vast majority of physical culture heroes
who maintained good health and active lifestyles
well into their advanced years were men and
women who prided themselves on staying lean,
fit and muscular.

So there you have it -- seven rules for lifelong
strength and health. You probably follow them
already, but a little reminder now and then is
a good thing.

As always, thanks for reading, and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. I mentioned Knife, Fork, Muscle and
Gray Hair and Black Iron. Go here to grab
them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_nutrition.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. We're also releasing Knife, Fork, Muscle
as a series of Kindle e-books. Same content,
but broken into four books. Books 1, 2 and 3
are already available, and book 4 will be out
soon.

Go here for the complete list of all of our
kindle books, with order links for all of
them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "The ultimate
goal is lifelong strength and health."
-- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

Helping You Save Clams on Postage

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

When I published Dinosaur Training back
in 1996, postage rates were fairly low,
even for international mail.

So I could fill orders from around the world
at a relatively low cost for shipping and
handling.

But postage rates have gone higher and
higher over the years - especially for
international mail.

Case in point. A guy from Australia
ordered Dinosaur Training today, and
the shipping and handling was almost
double the cost of the book.

That's because our shopping cart uses
Priority Mail shipping as a default option.

And Priority Mail is expensive for
international shipping.

However, if you want to save clams on
shipping for an international order,
it's easy to do.

Just place your order, and include a note
in the Special Instructions section of the
on-line order form asking us to ship your
book or books by First Class Mail instead
of Priority Mail.

We'll go ahead and calculate the cost for
First Class Mail and ship it that way. And
we'll refund the difference between the
two shipping charges.

Trudi just did exactly that for the guy I
mentioned in Australia - and saved him
a whopping 22 clams on postage.

That's more work for us, of course, but
we're happy to do it if it helps our
Dinos.

Of course, the other thing we're doing to
help with shipping and handling is to offer
Dinosaur Training books and courses in
PDF and Kindle format.

This is a great option for everyone, but
it's especially good for overseas Dinos,
because there is literally ZERO in
shipping and handling charges.

Right now, we have 22 Dinosaur Training
books and courses on Kindle. Here's the
complete list - and we're adding more and
more all the time:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

Important - you do NOT need to purchase
a kindle device to read Kindle e-books. You
can download an app that lets you read
them on any device. There's a link for
the app on every sales page in the
Kindle bookstore.

If you prefer PDF to Kindle, check out the
section of PDF books and courses at our
products page. There's a lot of them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Also, note that we've bundled Dinosaur
Training Secrets 1, 2 and 3 - so you can
grab all three courses with one purchase.
We got the idea from Amazon, which
bundles all three courses in the Kindle
bookstore.

I know that some of you prefer hard copy
books and courses, and we'll continue to
offer those - but the Kindle and PDF options
will help many of you save some major
clams. And saving major clams is a
very good thing.

Yours in strength,
Brooks Kubik

P.S. The January Dino Files is available
in Kindle and PDF editions - AND in a
hard-copy edition printed and shipped
to you by Amazon.

PDF edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

Amazon hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017hardcopy.html

***********************************************************************************

Is Strength Training Part of Your DNA?

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

A couple of years ago I did an interview
on Carl Lanore's SuperHuman Radio
program.

Carl had just gotten back from a 10 day
vacation in Alaska. One day, he went dog-
sledding on a frozen glacier.

It was great fun, and he loved the powerful
husky dogs that pulled the sled.

The guide explained that Alaskan huskies are
specially bred to be perfect sled dogs. They
LOVE to pull. It's what they were born to do.
If they don't work hard every single day, they
don't feel good. They start to misbehave. They
exhibit all the signs of what we would call
depression and anxiety in humans.

Huskies are working dogs. They are bred to
work -- and it makes them happy. It's how
they express their DNA.

Carl wondered if this also applies to human
beings?

Are some of us compelled to enjoy heavy
strength training?

Does our DNA lead us to enjoy lifting heavy
things?

Does this explain why some people enjoy long
distance running, while others enjoy a hard
set of heavy squats or deadlifts?

In response, I shared my own family story.
My father's family is from Martin, Slovakia,
located in the rugged Tatra Mountains close
to the border between Slovakia and Poland.

They had a lumber business on a hill. They
cut down the trees, cut the logs into planks,
boards and beams, and carted the lumber
over the mountains and into Poland. They
sold the lumber in Poland because they
could get a better price for it there.

So I come from a family of Central European
lumberjacks. A family with good DNA for
hard, physical work and lots of heavy
lifting.

With that background, is it any surprise
that I discovered strength training at a
very young age -- and became fascinated
with it -- and have been training now for
more than 50 years?

Is it any wonder that I become grumpy
and irritable if I can't train -- or that I
always feel a thousand times better when
I'm training hard and heavy on a regular
basis?

Any wonder that last night, at age 60, I
went outside, set up a lifting area with
stall mats over the drive-way, got out my
barbell and plates, and did a 90 minute
workout under the setting sun?

I'm like those sled dogs -- I'm bred to
work.

And note this: other types of exercise don't
appeal to me at all -- including things that
many people love to do.

High rep calisthenics?

I don't like them. I only like low rep, high
intensity, hard to do bodyweight exercises.

Long distance running?

Forget it. Not interested.

Swimming?

I could care less.

Cycling?

Yawn.

Tennis?

Double yawn.

Golf?

A rich man's sport. My grandfather, a steel
worker, despised the game. My father played
it exactly one time. I've never even tried to
hit a golf ball.

There's nothing at all wrong with these things.
They're just not for me.

I was bred for lifting -- and that's what I like
to do.

If you're reading this, the same is probably
true of you.

You're an Iron Warrior. You were born to lift
heavy things. It's in your DNA.

In short, you're like me. You're a Dinosaur.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a good
one.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. If strength training is part of your DNA, then
you'll like these:

1. Gray Hair and Black Iron

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

2. Strength, Muscle and Power

http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

3. Dinosaur Dumbbell Training

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_dumbbelltraining.html

4. Dinosaur Bodyweight Training

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_bodyweight.html

5. Chalk and Sweat

http://www.brookskubik.com/chalk_and_sweat.html

6. Dinosaur Training

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_training.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day: "Find what you like to,
and then do it." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

The No. 1 Question About Warm-Ups

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk iron.

1. The January Dino Files.

Is now available in both PDF and
Kindle editions - AND (get this) in
hard-copy. The hard-copy is printed
and shipped to you by Amazon.

PDF edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

Amazon hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017hardcopy.html

2. The Complete List

Speaking of Amazon, here's the complete
list of all 22 Dinosaur Training e-books
available in the Kindle bookstore, with
quick and easy order links for all of them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

Our Kindle books are just the thing for
those of you who are trapped indoors
by bad weather - or who just want some
great weekend reading.

Note that you do NOT need a Kindle reader
to read Kindle books. Amazon has a free app
you can download that lets you read Kindle
books on any device.

3. The No. 1 Question About Warm-Ups

On the training front, here's an email from
an older Dino with a very common training
question:

"Brooks,

My question concerns warm-up sets. As an
older lifter (57), I like to do a lot of warm-up 
sets before my top weight for the day. I like
low reps, never doing more than 5, and often
doing triples, doubles or even singles.

If I'm doing squats, and my top weight for the
day is 200 pounds, I might start with the empty
bar, and then do 95, 135, 155, 175, 195 and then
200.

Now here's the question: When I add weight and
progress to a top set with 205 pounds, do I also
add 5 pounds to each warm-up set?

If I do that, eventually the first warm-up set will
be very heavy. On the other hand, if I stay with
the bar, and then go to 95 and so on, eventually
I will be doing many more warm-up sets.

What do you recommend?

Banny"

Thanks for your email and your question. It's a
very common one.

Older lifters need to start light, and they need to
perform a series of gradually heavier warm-up
sets before they tackle their heavier weights.

When you add weight to your working set, you
should keep your initial warm-up sets where they
are. That allows you to start light and work up
slowly and gradually.

The place where you make your adjustments is
at the top of the warm-up progression.

In the example you gave, I would try this: empty
bar, 95, 135, 155, 175, 185, 195, 205.

Or this: empty bar, 95, 135, 155, 175, 190, 200,
205.

By the time you work up to 250 pounds for your
top set, things might look like this: empty bar,
95, 135, 155, 175, 195, 215, 230, 240, 250.

If you end up needing to do a few more warm-up
sets, don't sweat it. Just do them. At our age,
they're very important.

Hope that helps, and hope you keep on training
for another 57 years!

As always, thanks for reading, and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a good
one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. For more about effective training for older
Dinos, grab Gray Hair and Black Iron:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are
right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Start light and
easy and finish heavy and strong." - Brooks
Kubik

*********************************************************************************** 


New Photos of the Dino Dungeon!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I got off work a bit early yesterday, and
so I got to train in the sunshine instead
of the moonlight - although both are
lots of fun.

The workout started with a brand-new
Dino-approved total body-warm-up
drill - sweeping the leaves off of my
outdoor lifting area.

Then I set up the stall mats and got
out the bar and plates.

And then I did the rest of my warm-ups
and got into the serious stuff.

Trudi came out and took a couple of
photos. You can see them right here
on my Instagram account:

https://www.instagram.com/brooks_kubik/?hl=en

Feel free to hit the LIKE button and
leave comments!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

Should You Plan Your Workouts or Train Based on How You Feel?

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two important notes, and then we'll talk
training.

1. The January Dinosaur Files

Is now available in both PDF and
Kindle editions - AND (get this) in
hard-copy. The hard-copy is printed
and shipped to you by Amazon.

PDF edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

Amazon hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017hardcopy.html

2. The Complete List

Speaking of Amazon, here's the complete
list of all 22 Dinosaur Training e-books
available in the Kindle bookstore, with
quick and easy order links for all of them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

Note that you do NOT need a Kindle reader
to read Kindle books. Amazon has a free app
you can download that lets you read Kindle
books on any device.

3. Should You Plan Your Workouts or
Train
Based on How You Feel?

A reader asked me whether I always plan
my workouts before training or whether I
base the workout on how I feel that day.

That's a good question, and it's one that
seems to puzzle lots of people -- probably
because they view it as an "either/or" when
it's really a "bit of both."

To begin with, I always have a long term
training plan, and long term goals -- usually
a one year plan, but sometimes a bit longer.

To get there, I break things down into a
series of mini-cycles. I like to do one month
mini-cycles. I set specific goals for each of
the one month cycles.

I alternate lighter weeks with more volume
and heavier weeks with less volume.

This is a simple but effective way for an older
Dino to train. I call it "simple cycling." It's a
way of maximizing recovery by using a
combination of light, medium and heavy
days.

I always go back through my training log,
and review the last couple of workouts,
and then write up my workout -- with
all of the exercises, sets, reps and
weights.

So the answer to the question is "Yes, I plan
my workouts very carefully."

But I also listen to my body, and based on
how I feel on a given day, I may change
things up a little once I start training.

Mike Burgener has a good way of putting it:

"When the oven is hot, you do your cooking."

In other words, if everything is clicking on a
given day, use more weight or do more sets
or more reps.

BUT -- and this is very important -- you also
need to go lighter and easier on those days
when that oven just won't heat up.

And this is one of the very hardest things to
learn. But it's also one of the most important.
If you're having an off day and you try to push
through it, things usually don't go very well. It's
better to train light, and then come back and
hit it harder another time.

Of course, you don't want to take it too easy
too often -- but if you're a Dino, there's not
much danger of that happening.

So plan your workouts -- but listen to your body,
and make any necessary adjustments after you
chalk your hands and get going.

Hope that helps!

As always, thanks for reading, and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Gray Hair and Black Iron covers simple
cycling systems for older trainees -- and details
over 50 great workouts for older Dinos:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. Progression is the name of the game,
and I cover a variety of very effective progression
systems in Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 3:

Hard copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_03.html

Kindle e-book

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets3_kindle.html

PDF

See the links to our PDF courses at our products
page:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. My other books and courses are right here
at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 4. Thought for the Day: "Think, plan, and
pay attention." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

Are You a Strength Training Specialist or a Generalist?

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk
iron.

1. The January Dinosaur Files

Is now available in both PDF and
Kindle editions - AND (get this) in
hard-copy. The hard-copy is printed
and shipped to you by Amazon.

PDF edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

Amazon hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017hardcopy.html

The Amazon hard-copy is something new,
so it's  a bit of an experiment. If you order
the hard-copy, let me know how you like
it.

If it works out, we may be able to offer
more books and courses - as well as
The Dino Files - with the Amazon
hard-copy option.

2. The Complete List

Speaking of Amazon, here's the complete
list of all 22 Dinosaur Training e-books
available in the Kindle bookstore, with
quick and easy order links for all of them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

3. Are You a Strength Training Specialist
or a Generalist?

On the training front, let's talk about
specialists and generalists.

Earlier in the week I outlined my current
training program, and noted that I'm
specializing in Olympic weightlifting --
so I limit my workouts to weightlifting
exercises: the snatch, the clean and jerk,
high pulls, front squats and back squats.

There are lots of other good exercises,
and plenty of other good equipment and
good training tools -- many of which I
have used in the past -- but as I said,
I'm specializing on weightlifting now,
and it makes more sense to focus all
of my energy on weightlifting.

Also, at age 60, my recovery ability is
more limited than when I was younger.
So If I were to add other things to the
mix, I'd probably end up over-training.

And that's never a good idea.

And also -- I like to concentrate on one
thing at a time, and work very hard to
master it. That's me. That's how I am.
It's not right or wrong, it's just how I
like to do things.

But many other Dinos have a different
approach. Some enjoy doing a much
broader variety of things.

In fact, they get bored if they don't
have enough variety in their training.

Thus, we have Dinos who combine
strength training with martial arts
training. (This is a very popular
combination.)

We have Dinos who like to add strong-
man training to their workouts.

We have Dinos who enjoy rack work
and heavy partials -- or heavy supports
to build stronger and thicker bones.

Kettlebells are popular with many Dinos.
So are dumbbells -- and cables -- and
bodyweight training -- and specialized
grip training.

Those are all great. I've done many of
them at different times in the past --
and I've had lots of fun doing them, and
gotten good results from them.

As I often say, it's all good, and it all
works.

So don't be worried if you like to do
something that's different than what I
like to do. The basic principles are the
same for all of us: hard work, progression,
and regular, consistent effort are the keys
to success.

So are the mental aspects. Concentration,
visualization and focus work wonders no
matter what you're doing.

And, of course, you need to find the right
balance between doing enough exercise
to make gains and not doing so much that
you outrun your recovery ability.

I cover that issue in detail in Dinosaur
Training Secrets, Vol. 1. It will help you
find the right balance between too little
and too much -- and help bring you some
terrific gains, whether you are a strength
training specialist or a generalist. If you
don't have a copy, grab the little monster
today -- it will help you enormously.

In the meantime, today's a training day
at Dino Headquarters -- and I plan to
hit it hard! So if you hear reports about
a small earthquake in Louisville, you'll
know it's just a 60-year old Dino having
some fun with the iron.

As always, thanks for reading, and have
a great day. If you train today, make
it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 1 is
available in hard copy, PDF and Kindle
editions:

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

Kindle 

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

PDF

See the links to the PDF books and courses
on our Products page:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day: "You don't
have 
to do it like anyone else, but you
do need to
do it." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

The Complete List

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

It's hard to believe I published my
first book, Dinosaur Training: Lost
Secrets of Strength and Development,
way back in 1996.

And it's hard to believe it took almost
20 years to start offering e-books.

We waited until  February, 2015 before
releasing our first book or course on
Kindle - but since then, we've been
making up for lost time!

We now have 22 Kindle e-books for
you - so many that we put together
a special page for all of them.

Go here to check it out:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

And, yes, there will be many more
to come!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

"Are You Still Getting Stronger?" He Asked

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One quick note and then we'll talk training.

1. The January Dino Files - Now on Kindle!

We just released the January issue of The
Dinosaur Files on Kindle.

Sprint on over here to grab the little monster:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

If you prefer the Dinosaur Files in PDF,
the PDF edition is right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

As always, let me know how you like this
month's issue - and if you grab the Kindle
version, please post a review! The reviews
are super helpful for us.

2. "Are You Still Getting Stronger?" He
Asked

A younger guy -- I think he is in his 20s --
asked me an interesting question the other
day.

"Are you still getting stronger?" he asked.

As I said, it was an interesting question.

Blunt, a bit personal, but interesting.

Just what you would expect from a
young whippersnapper.

The answer is "Yes and no."

On some things, I'm not as strong as I was
20 or 30 years ago -- but on other things
I'm as strong as ever and working to get
stronger.

But much more ore importantly, I'm training
regularly, I feel great,  and I'm having lots
of fun.

I'm doing Olympic weightlifting now, and
I've set myself some high goals. I'm 60,
and I plan to lift more at age 60 than I
lifted in my 50's -- and to do it in better
form -- which is both challenging and
motivating.

In fact, "motivating" is an understatement.

You should see the chalk and sweat flying
through the air when I train.

Anyhow, that was my answer.

Then I asked a simple question in return.

"Why do you ask?"

And he said that he worried about whether
he could maintain his strength into his 50s
and 60s.

I don't know the answer to that question,
because it depends on too many variables.

But I do know this.

The way to be strong and healthy and in
great condition at age 50 or 60 -- or
beyond -- is to:

1. Start training now.

a. I assume you are doing this already -- but
if not, now's the time to start!

2. Train hard but smart.

a. Don't over-train.

b. Train progressively.

c. Use ground-based, stand on your feet
exercises.

3. Avoid exercises that can cause injuries.
(There's a complete list of them in Gray
Hair and Black Iron.)

a. You can't train if you hurt yourself.

4. Find things you like to do exercise-wise,
and do them.

a. If you enjoy your training, you're much
more likely to stick with it.

5. A short workout beats no workout.

a. It's much easier to start and keep going
than to start, stop and have to start all over
again.

6. Follow a healthy diet.

a. See Knife, Fork, Muscle for details.

7. Keep your weight under control.

a. This is extremely important. Lard Lumps are
deadly as you grow older.

b. All the bad stuff starts with Lard Lumps:
diabetes, high blood pressure, heart problems,
etc.

And always remember this:

You can make great progress at any age, but
if you let yourself go for too long when you're
young, it makes it very difficult to get into good
shape (or get back into good shape) when you're
older.

So if you're a younger Dino  -- like the guy who
asked me the question -- make the most of your
younger years and START TRAINING.

As always, thanks for reading and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Gray Hair and Black Iron will help you build
strength and muscle for the long haul -- and help
you maintain strength and muscle when you are
an older Dino:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. Knife, Fork, Muscle is available in both
hard-copy and a series of Kindle e-books. Go here
for the links:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Start training
when
you're young, and keep training when
you're older."
-- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

New on Kindle - The January Dino Files!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We just released the January issue of The
Dinosaur Files on Kindle.

Head on over and grab the little monster:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017kindle.html

And please be sure to post a review after
you read this month's issue. The reviews
really help us.

If you prefer the Dinosaur Files in PDF,
the PDF edition is here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

 ***********************************************************************************

Fast, Fun and Effective!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I hit a hard workout last night in the
outdoor lifting area of the new
Dinosaur Dungeon.

The new Dinosaur Dungeon is the
basement of the duplex we moved
into last year after selling our house
and downsizing.

It features my IronMind squat stands,
an old beater bar for squats, a rubber
mat to stand on and plenty of plates.

It also includes my Indian clubs and
my Eleiko bar, which I use for pulls
when I train inside and for overhead
work when I train outside.

Trudi's training area is 10 feet across
the room.

It includes her Trap Bar, hyperextension
bench, Inversion Table, dumbbells and
kettlebells.

It's all wedged around two washers,
two dryers, the furnace, a long rack
to hang clothes, a long table to fold
clothes, and a big, wooden work
bench.

That's good, because it doesn't leave
any room for chrome and ferns, a pec
dec, or cardio theater.

And there's no room for other gym
members - meaning no one  trying
to use the squat stands to hang his
gym towel and water bottle.

Anyhow, it's just me when I train and
Trudi when she trains, and that's the
way we like it.

When the weather is nice, I move
outside and do overhead work.

That's what I did last night.

I set up some rubber mats on the
driveway, and did a ton of old-school,
split-style snatches. As in, 10 minutes
of warming up and 55 minutes of
snatches, starting light and working
up in weight slowly and gradually.

I did all singles because I'm working
on form - and singles are best when
you're working on form.

The outdoor lifting area is almost but
not quite level, so the bar rolls a bit
on the rubber mats.

To stop it from rolling, I use two very
high tech devices.

You'll laugh when I tell you what they
are.

I put a small folded towel behind the
plates - and a long twig a little bit
bigger than a no. 2 pencil in front of
the plates.

Okay, it's not high-tech - but it works.

You can see the whole set-up right
here:

https://www.instagram.com/brooks_kubik/?hl=en

Anyhow, it was a fun workout outside
under the setting sun.

And an effective one.

And that's what counts.

Fun and effective workouts.

Remember, you can train anywhere - and
you can always get a terrific workout.

As always, thanks for reading and
have a great day. If you train today,
make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. I have tons of other great workouts
(more than 50 of them) in Gray Hair and
Black Iron:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. Go here to grab the January
issue of The Dinosaur Files in PDF:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

P.S. 3. My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 4. Thought for the Day: "Three
very
important words: barbell,
basement, lifter."
- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

I Get This Question All The Time!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One quick note, and then we'll talk iron.

1. The January Dinosaur Files.

Is available right here in PDF format:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

We're finishing up the Kindle edition,
and will release it soon.

As always, be sure to let me know how
you like the little monster.

2. I Get This Question All The Time!

On the training front, here's a very
common question. I get it all the time.

A reader wants to do a three-exercise
program:

1. Squat

2. Clean and press

3. Deadlift

He'd include some sandbag finishers, and that
would be it.

Note: I assume this is a divided workout program
with one exercise in each workout. It would be very
hard to do all three in one workout several times a
week. Also, if you did clean and press and one or
both of the other movements, the clean and press
should come first. Always do your explosive
movements (meaning the clean, in this case)
at the beginning of your workout.

Anyhow, his question is this:

"I feel a bit guilty for not incorporating direct chest
or bicep work. Can I get a good chest workout --
biceps, too -- from these three exercises without
doing a specific bench press or curl?"

Now, I get variations of this question all the time.
Readers want to know if their arms and chest will
shrink away to nothingness if they stop doing
bench presses and curls and focus instead on
heavy pushing, pulling and squatting.

So here's the answer.

1. If upper arm size is important to you, then do
curls or pull-ups once a week.

a. Pull-ups would have the added benefit of working
your lats, which would be good to do.

2. If chest size is important to you, then do bench
press, incline press or dumbbell variations of either
movement once a week -- or do some variation
of pushups.

3. If upper arm size and chest size is important to
you, then you need to train these muscles.


a. Otherwise, you'll fret and worry that you are
losing size, and that will just derail your entire
program.

b. Why make things harder for yourself?

4. If upper arm size and chest size is NOT that
important to you, then you can either do the
direct arm and chest work or skip it, as you
prefer.

5. Note that many old-timers never did any bench
pressing or curling -- and they did fine.

a. You also have many old-timers who never did
bench presses. John Grimek is a good example --
he never did bench presses, but he was the best
developed man of his generation -- and one of
the strongest.

6. Most Olympic lifters don't do bench presses or
direct arm work, and they do just fine.

7. In most cases, the guys who ask the question
should do some direct arm and chest work --
because the mere fact that they are asking
the question suggests that they will worry
that they are "getting smaller" if they don't
include those exercises -- even if they're
actually growing like weeds from the heavy
leg and back work.


a. Remember, 90% of the physical game is a
mental game.

b. See 3(a) and (b) above.

8. Some trainees (especially older trainees)
have shoulder issues that make bench pressing
difficult or impossible for them. If that's the
case, do incline bench work or pushups or
just stick to overhead presses.

9. Always remember that your current program
is not what you will be doing for the rest of your
life.

10. In other words, you can skip direct arm and
chest work for a couple of months, and then
work it back into your program. Problem
solved!

And that's the answer to a very common question.
I hope it helps. If anyone has additional thoughts,
send them on in.

And remember to grab the January issue of the
Dinosaur Files! It's a great issue.

As always, thanks for reading and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S.If you're interested in some fun variations
of pull-ups and push-ups, grab Dinosaur
Bodyweight Training:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_bodyweight.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses -- and links
to my other PDF courses and Kindle e-books --
are right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Focus on leg and
back
work, and fill in the rest of your workout
as needed.
You'll do fine." -- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

A Quick Tip on Power Rack Training

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

In response to my recent email on
isometric and isometronic training,
one of our readers sent in this
email:

Hi Brooks,

I'm new to your email list. I have
enjoyed the daily topics. The
information is encouraging.

My reply is in regards to isometric
and isometronic training.

In the mid 80's, I was a student at
Oregon State University, working on
my BS in Health and Human
Performance.

My favorite instructor was J.P. O'Shea.

Dr. O'Shea was a very accomplished
Pan American weightlifter in the 50's,
and the author of many books on
strength development.

He did research on "functional
isometrics." This was barbell
training in a power rack, where
near maximal loads were lifted
from a lower pin and held against
an upper pin for approximately
five seconds. 

The range of motion was only a
couple of inches. 

The position trained was usually
in the range of the least mechanical
advantage of the lift.

I had the privilege of training with
Dr. O'Shea for a 10-12 week cycle
of functional isometric squat training.
I would have to say this was some
of the most mentally challenging
training I have ever done.

I believe I still have a research
paper he wrote on the subject.
 
I will attempt to locate and pass
on to you if I find it.

Dan Morgan

Thanks for your feedback, Dan. That
method of training is a very good one.
I consider it to be isometronics rather
than isometrics, but the label doesn't
matter.

What matters is that it's a very good
way to build some serious strength
and muscle.

I cover this type of rack work - and
many other types of rack work in
Strength, Muscle and Power.

These methods are some of the toughest
and most effective training methods out
there - and for serious trainees, they're
hard to beat.

If you find that research paper, send it on
in - I'd love to see it! I have an autographed
copy of Dr. O'Shea's book, Quantum Strength
Fitness II, and I really enjoy it.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Go here to grab Strength, Muscle and
Power:

http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

P.S. 2. Remember to grab the January issue
of The Dinosaur Fules:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

P.S. 3. My other books and courses - and
links to all of my PDF and Kindle books and
courses - are right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 4. Thought for the Day: "Old gold still
spends, and old iron still builds strength
and
muscle." - Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

My New Favorite Exercise

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk iron.

1. The January Dinosaur Files

Is available in PDF format right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

As always, let me know how you like the
little monster.

2. Good Reading for Snow-Bound Dinos

I know that many of you are buried in
snow today. If you are, head over to the
Dino website and check out our PDF and
Kindle books and courses for some great
reading:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

You have something like a dozen titles to
choose from, so you should be able to
find something you like.

3. My New Favorite Exercise

I've been having a lot of fun lately with my
new favorite exercise.

It's one that I've done before, but I got away
from it. Now I'm back to it -- and I'm really
glad to be doing it again.

It's a three-exercise compound movement
using a barbell: the clean, front squat and
press/push press/or jerk.

Here's how you do it:

1. Clean the barbell to the shoulders.

a. I prefer to squat clean the bar, but you
can power clean it if you prefer.

b. You perform one just clean, and then
move on to the front squats.

2. Perform one to three front squats.

a. Remember to keep your elbows as high
as possible on the front squats.

b. To perform these correctly, you'll need to
wear lifting shoes with a heel. Otherwise,
you'll lean too far forward at the bottom
of the movement.

c. If you perform reps in the front squat, do
them consecutively. In other words, it's one
clean followed by all of your front squats.

d. Note that you can do three reps in the
front squat on your first working set, then
add weight and do two reps in the front
squat on the next set, and then add weight
and do one rep in the front squat on the third
(or fourth and fifth) work sets.

3. Finish with a press, push press, power
jerk or split jerk.

a. Do one rep of whatever overhead lift you
choose to finish the movement.

That's one set: one clean, one to three front
squats and one overhead lift. A total of three
to five total reps.

Begin with a light weight and do a series of
three to five progressively heavier warm-up
sets.

After the warm-ups, do three to five working
sets.

This is a great way to get a fast, hard workout
that combines "stand on your feet" strength
and power training with a good conditioning
workout.

If you have dumbbells or kettlebells, you can
perform the combination with dumbbells or
kettlebells. It also works with sandbags.

If you don't have a squat rack, this is one
of the very best ways to work your legs
with nothing but a barbell.

For extra leg work, finish up with a few sets
where you do one clean followed by three to
five reps in the front squat and no overhead
lift. This may allow you to go a bit heavier in
weight, but even if you don't add weight you
will be working your legs extra hard by doing
the extra reps.

Note that you can make the front squats even
harder by performing them pause style.

You can make this a complete workout, or
you can include other exercises. I like to do
it after my clean and jerks. It serves as a
good leg workout for an older trainee.

This is one of those "No Excuses" workouts. It
doesn't take much in the way of equipment --
and it doesn't take much time -- so there's
no excuse for not doing it.

Give it a try and let me know how you like
it!

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day.  If you train today, make it a good
one.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. I cover a number of other two-exercise and
three-exercise combinations in Dinosaur
Dumbbell Training - along with 50 different
Dumbbell workouts:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_dumbbelltraining.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are right
here -- including links to my other e-books on
Kindle:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "A champion makes
it work; everyone else makes excuses."
-- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

The Super Pressing Routine that Failed

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I often get questions from readers who ask
about the latest super program.

Usually it's a high volume workout -- and
often it involves daily training.

"Will it work?" they ask.

In response, let me share a story about a
good friend who used to do a super pressing
program many years ago.

He was a thick-boned mesomorph. What you
would call an easy gainer. And he had been
training for many years, and was very
experienced. If the program worked
for anyone, it should have worked for
him.

He got it directly from a leading expert. It
was a personalized training program. So he
thought it would be pretty good.

It was a special "Bulgarian style" pressing
program where you did a different pressing
movement every single day.

Leave aside the fact that the press was no
longer a part of Olympic weightlifting at this
point in time -- and the Bulgarian weightlifting
team didn't do daily pressing at that point in
time (if they had ever done it).

The super program went like this:

1. You trained six days a week.

2. You did military press in one workout --
incline press in another -- partial presses
in a third workout -- bench press in another
one -- and so on. You did multiple sets of
low to medium reps in all of your exercises.

3. You were supposed to be very sore at
first, but you were told to tough it out and
keep going -- and you were assured that
your muscles would "adapt" to the daily
training very quickly.

The idea was to hit the pressing muscles
from as many different angles as possible.

It was supposed to translate into big gains
in all of the different exercises -- including
the bench press, which was what my friend
was most interested in increasing.

My friend tried it, and got great results --
for a couple of weeks. I remember how he
raved about it. He felt like he had finally
found the answer to big gains.

Then he crashed and burned.

He got so stale he had to take a layoff --
and he ended up WEAKER than when he
started the program.

Amazingly, he tried it again a year later.

Same program.

Same result.

Crash and burn and weaker than when he
started.

But a year later, he tried it again - for a
third time!

And the same thing happened.

And that's the problem with the super
programs.

My friend would have done MUCH BETTER
on a "slow-cooking" program that featured
abbreviated workouts and a slow but steady
progression system.

The workouts and progression systems in
Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 3, would
have been ideal for him.

They're not the latest thing, they're not
from Bulgaria, and they're not super duper.

Heck, they're not even super.

But they work.

And that's what counts.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a good
one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Go here to grab Dinosaur Training Secrets,
Vol. 3, in your choice of hard-copy, Kindle or
PDF:

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_03.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets3_kindle.html

PDF

See the list of PDF courses on our Products
Page (link below in PS 2).

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are right
here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "If a training
program
sounds too good to be true, it
usually is." -- Brooks
Kubik

***********************************************************************************

The No. 1 Question About Thick Bars

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes and then we'll talk iron.

1. The New Dino Dungeon

I've posted photos of the new Dino
Dungeon on my Instagram page. Check
them out here:

https://www.instagram.com/brooks_kubik/?hl=en

2. The Dino Files

Go here to grab the January issue of the
Dinosaur Files in PDF format:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

3. The No. 1 Question About Thick Bars

Ever since I published Dinosaur Training
back in 1996, I've been buried in questions
from readers.

One of the most common questions involves
thick bars and how to use them. And there's
one question that I get pretty much all the
time.

Here's how one reader phrased it:

"I train self defense 3x a week. I train bodyweight
exercises 2x a week. I do heavy iron once a week
(one movement, such as squats or Trap Bar DL).

I'm currently on your suggested 5 x 5 and hope
to work my way down to singles as you prescribe
in your book. 

My question is around thick bars.

Should I just focus on overall strength and on
adding as much weight as possible to the bar?

Or should I switch to thick bar right now, build
the grip from day one, and sacrifice poundage?"

In other words , the reader is asking if he should
do Trap Bar deadlifts with as much weight as he
can handle -- or do thick bar deadlifts with much
less weight to train his grip?

Some readers phrase it like this:

"I want to do thick bar training, but I can't use
enough weight on thick bar deadlifts to work my
legs, hips and back hard enough -- so what do I
do?"

As I said, that's a VERY common question. I get
it at least once a week.

Luckily, there's a very simple answer.

Do this:

1. Train your deadlift or Trap Bar deadlift (or
any other pulling exercise) with a regular-sized bar,
and pile on the weight to build total body strength
and power.

2. At the end of your workout, use the thick bar
for thick bar deadlifts or timed holds or whatever
else you feel like doing. You won't be able to use
as much weight, but that's fine. You're not doing
the exercise to build all-around strength and
power -- rather, you're using it to build grip
strength.

Thus, you do your deadlifts TWICE -- with two
different bars -- at two different times in your
workout.

It's not either/or. It's not one or the other. It's
both.

Whenever I write programs, I give the basic
exercises to do -- and then I close by saying
"gut, grip and neck work of your choice." The
"grip work of your choice" at the end of the
workout is is where to use the thick bar.

Let me also note:

1. Don't do thick bar squats. It's too easy to
have the bar roll down your back, and that could
cause a very bad injury.

2. If you use a thick bar for overhead presses, push
presses or jerks, be very careful. You don't want to
drop it on yourself. Personally, I prefer to use thick
bars for deadlifts, curls, reverse curls and the
rectangular fix. I use a regular bar for overhead
work.

3. VERY IMPORTANT -- as in, life and death
important:

If you do thick bar bench presses, do them in a
power rack, with the pins set to catch the bar if
you drop it. A spotter won't be able to catch a
falling thick bar that's loaded to a heavy weight.

3a. I would NOT do dumbbell bench press or
incline dumbbell bench press with a thick-handled
dumbbell. Too easy to drop it, and no way to
catch it other than with your teeth -- which
will not be good.

4. If you do dumbbell cleans and swings with a
thick handled dumbbell, always use one dumbbell
at a time, so you can use the non-lifting hand
to help lower the dumbbell.

4a. It's very hard to hold onto a heavy dumbbell
when you lower it from above your head or
from your shoulder -- and remember, your
feet are directly beneath the dumbbell. If
you're holding a pair of thick handled
dumbbells, it will be very difficult to
lower them safely.

4b. I learned this when I cleaned a pair of
132 pound thick handled dumbbells. I'll
never forget the "What do I do now?"
thought that flashed through my mind
as I stood with the bells at my shoulders.

5. A little bit of heavy grip work with
a thick
handled barbell or dumbbell
goes a long way.


5b. Work in three to five sets at the end of
your workout and keep it up for a year or
two, and you'll look have Popeye forearms.

And that's the answer to the no. 1 question
about thick bar training.

As always, thanks for reading, and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a good
one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. 1. My new series of Dinosaur Training courses
is selling like hotcakes -- and getting rave reviews
from Dinos. There are three of the little monsters
so far -- and they're available in your choice of
hard-copy, PDF or Kindle e-book.

Here are the links for all three -- hard-copy first,
and then the Kindle e-book. The PDF links are
easy to find in the PDF section of our products
page, which is listed in PS 2 below.

a. Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 1.
"Exercises, Workouts and Training
Programs"

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

http://brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets01_kindle.html

b. Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 2,
"How Strong Are You?"

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_02.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets2_kindle.html

c. Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 3,
"How to Use Old-School Progression
Methods for Fast and Steady Gains in
Strength, Muscle and Power"

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_03.html

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets3_kindle.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses --and links to my
PDF and Kindle books and courses -- are right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Asking a question
is the only way to get an answer." - Brooks
Kubik

***********************************************************************************

The New Dino Dungeon

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I thought you'd enjoy some photos
of the new Dinosaur Dungeon.

It's in the basement of the duplex
we live in.

There's a photo of the new squats
and pulls area for training inside
when it's too cold or too wet to
go outside.

And a photo of the outdoor lifting
area for overhead stuff - a/k/a
snatches and clean and jerks.

And a second photo of the squats
and pulls area and some of my
plates.

And for comparison, a photo of
yours truly hitting a 302 pound
push press at the original Dino
Dungeon - and a photo of my
favorite gym of all, the garage
at our old house.

The photos are right here on my
Instagram account:

https://www.instagram.com/brooks_kubik/?hl=en

Hope you enjoy them!

If you do, shoot me an email and
let me know what you think.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Dinosaur Training started a
strength training revolution when
I released it in 1996 - and it's still
going strong, 21 years later:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_training.html

P.S. 2. "It doesn't take much to
get a great workout." - Brooks
Kubik

***********************************************************************************

Super Strength In 60 Seconds - Or Not!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One of our longtime readers asked me
about isometrics and whether they work.

He also asked if I had ever done them,
and if so, whther I still do them.

Those questions brought back some
interesting memories - so I thought
I'd share them with you.

I was a little young for the beginning of the
isometrics fad of the early 60's, but there
was still lots of fanfare and hoopla about
it in the late 60's, when I started training.

Isometrics promised super strength in 60
seconds a day -- consisting of a series of
6 second isometric exercises.

That was irresistable. What could be better
than super strength in 60 seconds a day?

So, of course, I tried the isometric system.

I began with the simple stuff. Put your hands
together and push with one and resist with
other.

Stand sideways in a doorway and push against
the side of the door frame with one foot.

Use a doorway chinning bar to practice the
overhead press lockout.

Later, one of the junior high school coaches
let me borrow an "Exergenie" device and a
discus for the summer, so I could do isometrics
with the discus after attaching the Exergenie
to my doorway chinning bar. (Yes, I threw the
discus in junior high school, before I decided
to stick to wrestling as my only sport.)

And I also bought a portable isometric device
from Peary Rader's Body Culture Equipment
Company. It was made from heavy pipe and
two lengths of log chain. It came with a wooden
base to stand on. It looked really cool.

I pulled and pushed against those pipes and
chains all winter one year.

But none of it worked.

It was fun, but it didn't deliver any sort of
results.

When I was in high school, we had a York
power rack, so we could do isometric stuff in
the power rack. But I never did. By age 14,
I was done with isometrics.

Later, I learned that some of the initial research
research behind isometrics was wrong. Something
about a misplaced decimal point.

The trainees tested at a world famous research
lab had NOT been making gains of 2% per week.

It was more like .2% per week -- meaning two
tenths of one percent.

Oops.

And then there was the querstion about roid use
by some of the "pioneers" of isometric training --
which raises the question, "IF it worked, was it the
drugs or the isometrics?"

So, as you can see, I'm not a big fan of isometrics.

Now, there was a slightly different variation
called isometronics. That involved short
range movements in the power rack with
heavy weights. That was REAL training.

I've used isometronics with great results. You
really can build super strength with isometronics.
But it's not 60 seconds a day. It's pretty much
the same as regular barbell training -- which
may be one reason why it works so well.

I cover isometronic training in Strength, Muscle
and Power. It won't give you super strength in
60 seconds a day, but it will MAKE you seriously
strong:

http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

As always, thanks for reading and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Be sure to grab the January issue of The
Dinosaur Files in PDF format:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses -- and links
to my Kindle and PDF courses -- are right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "The real secret is
hard work, regular training and a healthy diet."
-- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************

The Top 10 Reasons Why People Don't Do Squats

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Top 10 lists are always fun  -- so
here's one I think you'll enjoy.

The Top 10 Reasons Why People
Don't Do
Squats

10. They make your legs big, and you can't
wear hipster jeans.

9. They make you big all over, and then you
can't wear hipster anything.

8. They're too dangerous, and you know it
because you saw a guy doing them on a
stability ball and he fell off and hurt
himself.

8a. Another guy did squats on roller-skates,
and he hurt himself, too.

7. They don't have an app for it.

6. Suri doesn't say you should do them.

6a. Suri doesn't know what they are.

5. You read something on the internet that
said not to do them, and the guy who said
it had a really cool avatar.

4. You train at a gym where all the squat
cages are curl cages.

4a. Or towel and water bottle hangers.

3. You read something on the internet that
said squats were old-fashioned, and that
guy had a really cool avatar, too.

Note: There's a tie for no. 2, so I'll share
both of them with you.

2a. You've never done them, but you want
to be considerate of everyone else at the
gym and not hog all the big plates.

2b. If there's a Zombie Apocalypse, the
zombies will eat the big guys first.

And -- drum-roll, please -- here's the
no. 1 reason why people don't do
squats.

1. You're allergic to hard work.

I'm sure you can think of a few others!

Of course, Dinos don't think this way --
but sometimes it seems like everyone else
does!
As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a good
one.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Doug Hepburn always did plenty of squats,
asnd he did pretty darn well! Read about his life
and lifting in this power-packed course:

Hard-copy edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/doug_hepburn.html

Kindle e-book

http://www.brookskubik.com/hepburn_kindle.html

PDF with immediate electronic delivery

See the PDF courses on our Products page:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses -- including
links to my PDF and Kindle books and courses,
and to the Dinosaur Files -- are right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Skinny jeans
are
great, but squats are better." -- Brooks
Kubik


***********************************************************************************

The Best System of Sets and Reps

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One quick note, and then we'll talk iron.

1. The January Dino Files

Go here to grab the January issue of the
Dino Files strength training and iron
history journal:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurfiles-january2017.html

We'll get the Kindle version out as soon as
we can. I'll send an email when it's ready.

Be sure to let me know how you like this
month's issue. Your feedback is very
important to us!

2. The Best System of Sets and Reps

I get tons of questions about sets and reps.

Most of them are from someone asking me to
give him "the best" system of sets and reps.

But I can't do that.

No one can.

That's because there is no "best" system of
sets and reps.

When you talk about sets and reps, you need
to consider all of the following factors:

1. The "best' sets and reps vary from person to
person. What works best for ME may or may not
work best for you. For example:

a. Reg Park did great with with 5 x 5. Three Mr.
Universe wins. 500 pound bench press. One of
the best bodybuilders of all time.

b. Tony Terlazzo used 5 x 5 -- and did okay, but
then switched to 5/4/3/2/1, sets of 3 and sets of
2 -- and became an Olympic champion, and the
best lifter of his era.

c. John Davis did great with 8 x 2. Six World
championships and two Olympic gold medals.

d. Tommy Kono liked heavy triples. It worked
pretty darn well for him. Six World championships ,
two Olympic gold medals, one Olympic silver medal.

e. Doug Hepburn thrived on heavy singles. He won
the World weightlifting championship with them.

f. Peary Rader gained  almost 100 pounds of muscle
with 20 rep breathing squats. In terms of over-all
gains, that's hard to beat.

2. The "best" sets and reps will vary from exercise
to exercise. What works best for barbell curls may
or may not work best for presses -- and what works
best for presses may or may not work best for squats
and deadlifts.

2a. As a general rule, you should use lower reps on
exercises that involve a high level of skill and
technique, such as Olympic weightlifting. Most
weightlifters use singles, doubles and triples.

3. The "best" sets and reps will change for anyone
based on their level of experience. What works best
for a beginner is different than what works best for
an intermediate or advanced trainee.

4. What works "best' depends on what your goals
are. The best set/rep system for building strength
is different than the best set/rep system for building
endurance or "condition."

4a. Adding cardio work or upping your cardio may
change what sets and reps are best for you in your
strength training.

5. The "best' sets and reps will change as you grow
older. What works best for you at age 15 -- or age
25 -- or even age 35 -- will probably be different
than what works best for you at age 45, 55 or 65.

5a. General rule: as you grow older, drop the volume.
See Gray Hair and Black Iron for tips on age-
appropriate workouts for older Dinos.

6. The "best' sets and reps allow full recovery from
one workout to another. What allows full recovery will
change as you grow stronger. The stronger you are,
the less training you need -- or can stand.

6a. For example -- a beginner who does 1 x 12 in the
squat with 55 pounds on the bar is going to have a
much different effect on his body than an advanced
man who does 3 x 5 with 350 or 400 pounds. The
beginner's efforts are a mild stimulus for growth --
the advanced man's workout hits his body like a
freight train.

7. The "best" sets and reps are usually far less than
what you think they are. It's always easier to write
down a workout than to do it -- or to recover from
it.

7a. The vast majority of trainees at all levels of
development fail to achieve their full potential
because they over-train -- meaning that they do
too many exercises, too many reps and too many
sets.

And finally, as a corollary to all of the above --
the "best' sets and reps are almost NEVER what
you see in the muscle comics.

As always, thanks for reading, and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S.  For more about sets and reps -- and about
productive, real world strength training and muscle
building, grab Strength, Muscle and Power:

http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

P.S. 2. Older trainees should grab Gray Hair
and Black Iron:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 3. My other books and courses are right
here - along with the Dinosaur Files and links
to my Kindle and PDF courses:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 4. Thought for the Day: "Think, but don't
over-think. Train, but don't over-train."
-- Brooks Kubik

***********************************************************************************