Workouts for the Working Man

 
Old-school lifters like Louis Abele worked hard and demanding jobs, but still made excellent gains in their training.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Back in the 1950's, Peary Rader wrote an
article in IronMan titled "Workouts for the
Working Man."

The article covered effective training for
men who work demanding physical jobs.

If I recall correctly, Peary was answering a
question from a man who worked 10 or 12
hour days as a painter, going up and down
ladders, and performing thousands of reps
with a heavy paintbrush.

After a day like that, there wasn't much gas
in the tank for a 2 or 3 hour split routine
workout or 12 x 12 on all of his exercises.

So Peary suggested what we would now call
an abbreviated program -- with low reps,
because low reps help to conserve energy.

It was good advice.

A little bit of regular training goes a long way. You just need to make every minute count.

I was reminded of this because I received
an email this week from a man who works
10 or 12 hours a day on a construction job.

After 10 or 12 hours a day of carrying
bricks, concrete blocks and other construction
materials, and operating a jack hammer,
he doesn't have time or energy for a long
workout.

But he still wants to build some serious
strength and muscle.

So what does he do?

My answer is similar to Peary Rader's
answer.

He should follow a short, simple program
with a minimum number of exercises.

He should train one or two times during
the work week for 15 to 30 minutes per
workout -- and take a longer (45 minute)
workout on Sat or Sun.

Concentration, focus and mindfulness - three keys to great workouts.

He should do multiple sets of low reps in
each exercise. 5 x 5 would be perfect for
squats and deadlifts -- and it should be
four progressively heavier sets and one
set with his top weight for the day.

On upper body exercises he can do 3 x 5
or 3 x 6 -- two progressively heavier sets
and one set with his top weight for the day.

He should use perfect form in all of his
exercises. This will target the proper muscle
groups and make his training more productive
and more efficient. And it will be less tiring --
and a lot less wear and tear on his already
tired body.

Thus, his workout schedule might look
like this:

Tues

1. Standing press 3 x 5-6

2. Barbell curl 3 x 5-6

3. Neck work with head-strap 2 x 10

Thurs

1. Deadlift or Trap Bar deadlift 5 x 5

2. One-arm DB row 3 x 5-6

3. Grip work of his choice -- 1 or 2 sets

Sat

1. Squats 5 x 5

2. Bench press (barbell or dumbbell) 3 x 5-6

3. Gut work -- 1 set

If that's still too much work, he should cut
back even more -- and perhaps train once
a week on Sat or Sun -- doing his choice of
squats OR deadlifts, one upper body pressing
exercise, and one upper body pulling exercise,
plus one set of gut work.

For other workouts that would work very
well for this man -- or for any Dinosaur who
works a demanding job or who doesn't have
much time or energy for training -- grab
a copy of Chalk and Sweat:

http://www.brookskubik.com/chalk_and_sweat.html

In any case, I hope that helps our reader --
and anyone else who is crunched for time
but wants to train!

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a good
one.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Abbreviated training is very important for
older trainees. See Gray Hair and Black Iron
for more than 50 super-effective workouts for
older Dinos:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/oldschool_01-kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Where
there's a will -- and some weights --
there's a way." -- Brooks Kubik


 Before you leave . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - head on over and take a look:










The No. 1 Way to Avoid Dings and Dents

 
At age 60, I still train hard, heavy and serious - but I listen to my body, and if an exercise hurts, I replace it with one that doesn't. 


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We live in a part of town called The Highlands,
and as you can guess, it has a lot of hills.

When I was younger, I used to go to the park
and do hill sprints while carrying a pair of 70
pound dumbbells.

But today, at age 60, I don't do them any more.

They're just too hard on my ankles and my
achilles tendons.

As you grow older, the blood flow to your achilles
tendons diminishes. They get tighter and stiffer,
even if you stretch them. And you can make
them really sore -- as in, inflamed -- with
sprints or hill sprints.

The barbell has been a good friend for over 50 years - and I want us to stay friends for many more years to come.


My chosen sport is weightlifting, and I need to
keep my ankles and achilles tendons strong and
health for lifting. So I pass on the sprints and
the hill sprints -- even though, as I said, I once
did them, and I liked doing them.

That's the kind of adjustment you need to
make as you grow older. You always need
to keep training, of course -- but you may
need to change the way you train, or change
your exercises.

If something hurts, you may want to find an
alternative.

Front squats are my go to exercise for leg strength. That's a change from 20 or 30 years ago, but change is okay as you grow older.


If not, you're on the road to Ding and Dent
Land.

Also known as the Island of Lost Lifters.

And that's the number one way to avoid dings
and dents as you grow older. It's called listening
to your body -- and training SMART.

As always, thanks for reading and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. I cover many other ways to avoid or reduce
dings and dents in Gray Hair and Black Iron:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses
are right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/oldschool_01-kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Train hard,
but
train smart. Smart is what keeps you
lifting
for a long, long time." -- Brooks
Kubik


We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - head on over and take a look:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html


Doing It Right

Always train with total concentration and pinpoint focus. Make every rep count.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One of the things I focus on more
and more over the years is "doing
it right."

As in, performing every rep of every
set in letter perfect form.

And that includes your warm-up
sets.

It adds a very important dimension
to your training.

Doing it right places the resistance
exactly where you want it to be.

It helps prevent injuries - and that
includes acute injuries (where you
hurt yourself in the middle of a lift
or a set) and chronic injuries (where
you gradually wear yourself down
over time by training in bad form).

It lets you train with maximum
effectiveness - meaning that every
rep and every set delivers more
bang for the buck.

It helps you train with total focus
and complete concentration -
because that's the only way you
can dial in perfect form.

It's also more fun - because it feels
better to move the right way - and
because you know you're doing it
the right way.

A lot of people think form and
technique only matters if you're
doing a complex movement like
a snatch or a clean and jerk.

They're wrong.

Form and technique is critical in
complex movements, of course -
but also matters in relatively
simple movements, like curls.

Yes, curls.

There's a right way to do them,
and there's a wrong way to do
them.

And that goes for every exercise
under the sun.

Doug Hepburn wrote articles and
courses about how to do curls the
right way.

Bar placement - foot position -
how to hold the bar - locking the
elbows in place - breathing -
focus - the whole thing.

He covered it all.

He even talked about the kind of
shoes to wear!

And that was for good, old-fashioned
barbell curls - the first exercise that
most people ever learn - and the one
that everyone thinks they know how
to do.

And also, interestingly, the exercise
that more people do wrong than
almost any other movement.

Of course, that may have been one
of the reasons why Doug Hepburn
set a world record in the barbell
curl - by lifting 260 pounds in
letter perfect form.

If you're looking for the secret
of effective training, look no
further.

I've been talking about it for
this entire email.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Dinosaur Dumbbell Training
is a terrific resource that teaches
you how to perform dozens of
hard-hitting dumbbell exercises
in perfect form:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_dumbbelltraining.html

That's a one-hand dumbbell swing with 151-pounds of iron - and it didn't happen by accident. Always pay attention to the details. The little things matter.


P.S. 2. My other books and courses
are right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/oldschool_01-kindle.html

Dinosaur Training - a world-wide best seller for over 20 years.


P.S. 3. Thought for the Day:
"Anything worth doing is worth
doing right - and that goes
double for strength training."
- Brooks Kubik

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - head on over and take a look:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html



When Strength and Power Comes in Handy

 
Train so you can handle anything life throws at you. Did you know that World and Olympic champion John Davis (pictured here) once saved a co-worker's life after he got pinned under a heavy truck at a garage? Davis was able to lift the truck just enough so they could pull the man to safety.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I got an email from one of our
longtime Dinos last night.

He lives in Northern Kentucky,
and they got hammered by
some serious wind and rain
the other day.

There were trees down all over
the place - including two down
right across the road he was
driving home on.

And no one knew what to do.

No one other than our Dino.

He parked his car, got out, and
walked over to the trees.

And one by one, he dragged and
pushed them out of the road.

All by himself.

No one helped him.

He mentioned that he doesn't
train for ripped to the bone,
super cuts so people will call
him SHREDDED WHEAT.

Nor is interested in abs and
a tan.

He's interested in performance.

Function.

Being able to do things.

So he trains for strength and
power.

And yesterday, it paid off.

That's how all Dinos so it.

We train for strength and
power.

And sooner or later, it always
comes in handy.

As always, thanks for reading
and have a great day. If you
train today, make it a good
one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Our Dino also mentioned
that he's a big fan of the
strength and power programs
in my Doug Hepburn training
course:

This is the Kindle edition of my Doug Hepburn training course. Same text as the hard-copy and PDF course, but a different title and different cover.


Hard-copy:

http://brookskubik.com/doug_hepburn.html

Kindle e-book

http://www.brookskubik.com/hepburn_kindle.html

PDF

See the special section for PDF courses at
our products page:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses
are right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/oldschool_01-kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day:
"Strength and power always
comes in handy sooner or
later." - Brooks Kubik

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - head on over and take a look:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html




The Case of the Disappearing Dinosaur

From time to time readers drop off of our email list, and we never know why. Sometimes they assume it's because I've stopped sending emails - which is wrong. I send emails every day - and I plan to do it for a very long time.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One of our longtime Dinos just
signed back up for my daily
emails.

He included a short note about
it.

"I dropped off your email list,"
he said.

"This has happened several time
before."

"Does it happen to other people,
or just to me?"

Well, the fact of the matter is -
it happens to everyone.

Heck, it even happens to me.

And to Trudi.

I have no idea how or why this
happens.

My email service never has an
answer.

But it happens.

If you're like me, you're built for lifting, not for hitting those teeny-tiny buttons on a Monkey-Phone. That makes it easy to hit the unsubscribe button by mistake.
 
Which reminds me - if you read
my emails on an I-Phone, there's
an unsubscribe button that pops
up and makes it very easy to
unsubscribe by accident -
and it's especially easy to do
if you're (like me) a thick-
fingered, thick-thumbed
Dino.

But however it happens, it
happens.

Obviously, it's very frustrating.

So here's what you need to do.

1. Assume I'm alive and still
sending daily emails.

a. If that ever changes, I'm sure
you'll hear about it one way or
another.

b. But don't expect it to happen
any time soon.

2. That means, if you don't get
an email from me for a couple
of days, you have dropped off
the list and you need to sign
back up.

a. It's a nuisance, but it only
takes 5 or 10 seconds.

b. The sign-up box/link is on
every page of my website, so
it's easy to find.

John Davis never had to worry about emails and email lists. He just focused on setting World records.


3. Also, be aware that I post
each email on The Dinosaur
Training Blog. I do this as a
back-up.

a. You can access the Dinosaur
Training Blog thru the drop-
down bar on the landing page
at my website.

b. If you follow me on Twitter
or friend me on Facebook, that
makes it easy - because I send
the links to the Blog posts via
Twitter and Facebook.

c. If I can figure out how to share
the Blog links on Instagram, I'll
do that, too.

Arthur Saxon revealed his secret of strength in The Development of Physical Power - but he didn't say a word about emails and email lists and why people sometimes drop off the list without knowing it. 


4. You should probably check
the Dinosaur Training Blog once
in a while anyway - because when
I post my emails, I include photos
and video - so it's even more fun
than the emails.

a. For example, check this out:

http://dinosaurtraining.blogspot.com/2017/05/what-kind-of-shoes-do-you-wear-he-asked.html

5. If you ever have any questions
about the daily emails or Blog posts,
shoot me an email.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. 2. We have tons of great books
and courses at Dino Headquarters.

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/oldschool_01-kindle.html


We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - head on over and take a look:


Hitting It Hard at Dino Headquarters!

The outdoor lifting area at Dino Headquarters.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I've had several questions about
my current training and what I'm
doing, so I thought I'd give you a
brief report.

As I've mentioned, we moved last
year - sold the house  - downsized
to a nice little apartment - and I
brought my weights with me.

I train out in the driveway, using
some thick rubber stall mats for
a lifting platform.

When it rains, I do squats in the
basement.

I do Olympic lifting now, so my
workouts are 100% OL.

Training should be fun. Do the things that you enjoy doing.


Why?

Because it's a good workout - and
because I like doing it. At age 60,
after 50-plus years of training, I
get to do things that I like when I
train.

That's a very important point for
older Dinos.

Find things you enjoy. You're
much more likely to stick with
it if you do things you enjoy.

I try to train 3x a week, alternating
snatch workouts and clean and
jerk workouts. Sometimes, LIFE
gets in the way and I can only
train twice a week. Both work
fine.

It doesn't have to be fancy to be effective.


If time and energy permit, the
snatch workout looks like this:

1. 10 - 15 min warm-up

2. Power snatches

3. Snatch high pulls

4. Back or front squats

5. Gut work or hyperextensions

The clean and jerk workout
looks like this:

1. 10 - 15 min warm-up

2. Power clean and jerk

3. Clean high pulls

4. Back or front squats

5. Gut work or hyperextensions

If I'm pressed for time, I do
less. No big deal. The point is,
get in the workout, even if it's
a shorter one.

Anyhow, that's what I've been
doing - and I'm having lots of
fun doing it.

Check out the photos and videos
on Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/brooks_kubik/?hl=en

And if you're looking for more
workout ideas, and more training
tips, grab this:

Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 1.
"Exercises, Workouts and Training
Programs"

Kindle e-book

http://brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets01_kindle.html

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

PDF - see the section for PDF courses on
our products page:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

As always, thanks for reading
and have a great day. If you
train today, make it a good
one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik


We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - head on over and take a look:




Popular Among Horse Thieves!

 
Going strong at age 60 - after more than 50 years of iron. That's how Dinosaurs do it.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I got a letter the other day (not an
email, but a real letter) from a long-
time Dino.

He had copy no. 2443 of the first
printing of Dinosaur Training - from
back in 1996.

He also had a copy of the second
edition of the book - and mentioned
that he had an extra copy of the
second edition, which he used to
lend to people.

One day, he lent it out and it never
came back.

He said he hoped it was in good
hands, and it probably is.

I've received hundreds of similar
letters or emails over the years.

It seems that Dinosaur Training is
very popular among horse thieves.

And among guys who borrow
books and forget to give them
back.

That's all okay, because somehow
or other EVERYONE who trains
needs to read Dinosaur Training.

And everyone who buys a copy
needs to order an extra one -
just to lend out.

Or maybe two extra copies -
because they often don't come
back.

Go here to grab your copy of
the original little blue book
that changed the world:



http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_training.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. My other books and courses
are right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day: "Keep
it basic, keep it simple, and keep
it real - and keep on doing it!"
- Brooks Kubik

 
We have more than 25 Dinosaur training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - head on over and take a look: