"You've Got No Guts, Kid!"

Get ready for a heck of a story - one that I think you're going to enjoy enormously - and one that has an important lesson for all of us.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk training.

1. Strength, Muscle and Power

We're getting very close to the end of the
line for Strength, Muscle and Power -
and I'm not going to do another printing any
time soon - perhaps not ever - so if you want
a copy, grab it now:



http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

2. The March Dinosaur Files

Here's the link to grab the March issue of
The Dinosaur Files. It's a great issue,
and we've been getting some seriously
good feedback from Dinos around the
world.

Go here to grab the little monster:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-files-march2018pdf.html

Also - if you missed the October, Nov, Dec
Jan or Feb issues, go here to grab them so
you have the complete set:



Feb issue

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-files-february2018pdf.html

Oct, Nov, Dec and Jan issues

http://brookskubik.com/dinosaur_files.html

And please let me know how you like
this month's issue. Your feedback is
very important to us.

3. "You've Got No Guts, Kid!"

He was the captain of the chess team and a
bit of a bookworm.

In addition to chess and books, he loved to
swim. So he went out for the swim team.

But he had trouble making proper turns in
the pool -- which is bad news for a kid who
wants to be a competitive swimmer. It's
sort of like wanting to play baseball and
not being able to hit a curve ball.

His swim coach was less than happy with
him.

One day, the coach uttered these fateful
words:

"Kid, forget it. You'll never be a swimmer.
You've got no intestinal fortitude. You know
what that means? You've got no guts."

Twelve years later, the kid represented the
United States in the 1948 Olympic Games
in London.

Not in swimming -- but in wrestling!

In the semi-final match, he suffered a
crippling injury -- a severe muscle and
tendon tear in his chest.

He won the match, but afterwards he could
barely move. Pain ripped through his body
with every breath.

His coach told him to forfeit the gold medal
match.

"No way," he replied.

He went into the final match bandaged like a
mummy -- and challenged one of the very
best wrestlers in the world.

He won the match -- and the Olympic gold
medal.

His name was Henry Wittenberg, and he was
one of the greatest wrestlers who ever lived.

"No guts?"

Not hardly.

I don't know the name of the high school swim
coach who told Henry Wittenberg he had "no
guts" -- but I do know this:

People remember Henry Wittenberg.

No one remembers the swim coach.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Henry Wittenberg built tremendous strength
with old-school, Dino-style barbell and dumbbell
training -- the kind I cover in Dinosaur Training:
Lost Secrets of Strength and Development:



http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_training.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:



Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html



Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the day: 

"Anyone who tells you that you can't
do it is wrong - dead wrong - totally,
absolutely and completely wrong."


-- Brooks Kubik

BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:








































An Email from John Wood

If you're interested in building some serious pressing power, be sure to read this important email from John Wood.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

If you're not on John Wood's email list, you
missed an important email the other day -
so I thought I'd share it with you.

Brooks,

Got a ton of stuff going on right now so I want
to keep this short.

We have had quite a few people write in to ask
whether the John Wood Report issue #2 is or
will be available on Kindle...

At the moment, the answer is no, you can only
get it in the PDF format although I think that is
a much better deal since a) the format is much
more pleasing and b)you can print it out on
your end.

Grab your copy of issue #2 right here:


https://www.oldtimestrongman.com/john-wood-report/

It's a PDF download so you could be reading this
latest issue only a few mouse clicks from now, no
shipping needed.

This issue has also increased to 19 pages including
a  bonus article by Jan Dellinger!

In this issue you'll find:

* Five ways that I stay motivated.  Almost everyone
lists " motivation" as their number one training
problem -- but not me.  There are reasons why this
is the case, and in this article, I provide several simple
methods that you can starting using ASAP.

* Some Q & A on workout design -- a few hows
and whys of how I put my workouts together, including
how I program in variety so my training is never boring.

* The MOST EFFECTIVE exercise that I have ever
found to build overhead pressing power.  I have never
seen any other article written on this technique
anywhere, but it works like magic.

* Sledge Hammer Training part I -- I am not aware of
any course ever written on sledge hammer levering,
this is the first lesson and in my opinion, one of the
top exercises you can do to build forearm power.

Our good friend Dave Marcus, Iron Leaguer, and
Strength Secrets FB group member had this to say:

"The Hammer Man's Challenge from Issue #2 of
John Wood's Report is worth the price of the whole
issue."


Here's that link one more time -- you can get both issues
at the following page:

https://www.oldtimestrongman.com/john-wood-report/

Train Hard,

John Wood 

P.S. Already grabbed you copy?  Good move. Be sure to
send us a review or any questions you may have.


Some Thick Bar Safety Tips that Could Save Your Life!

Going strong at age 61 - after more than a half century of physical training - and I'm able to do it because I've avoided unnecessary injuries.  Here are some important safety tips for all Dinos to follow when they use thick-handled barbells and dumbbells. 


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes and then we'll talk training -
as in, some very important thick bar safety
tips.

And pay attention, because these tips could
literally save your life.

1. Good Stuff for Dinos

We have some great new stuff for Dinos,
with more on the way soon.

The March Dino Files is right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-files-march2018pdf.html

Grab it and read it  because the April
issue will be ready before you know it.

The John Wood Report is getting great
reviews - and you can grab the first two
issues right here:

Issue No. 1

https://www.oldtimestrongman.com/johnwoodreport-01.html

Issue No. 2

https://www.oldtimestrongman.com/johnwoodreport-02.html

And yesterday John Wood released Steve
Pulcinella's Iron Sport Gym 16-Week Power
Program - which is pretty good - and it's
available right here:

http://www.ironsport.com/shop/pdf/ironsport-workout-001/

So get ready for some great reading this
weekend!

2. Our Facebook Groups

John Wood has set up a terrific Facebook Group
called Strength Secrets. You have to apply for
membership, but if you tell John I sent you,
you should get in pretty easily.

In addition, Bill Hinbern and I are running a
Facebook Group called Dinosaur Training -
Brooks Kubik. You have to apply for member-
ship in that one, as well - but say you heard
about it here, and you'll be fine.

These are CLOSED groups to keep out the
bots, the snake-oil salesmen, and the roiders,
so they're pretty good. My advice is to join
both of them.

3. Some Thick Bar Safety Tips

I wrote about thick bars earlier in the week,
and I wanted to follow up with some very
important thick bar safety tips.

Don't do thick bar squats.

It's too easy to have the bar roll down your
back, and that could cause a very bad injury.

Plus, there's no benefit to them compared to
using a regular bar.

Be careful with overhead work.

If you use a thick bar for overhead presses,
push presses or jerks, be very careful. You
don't want to drop the bar on your head,
neck or upper back.

The same goes for overhead carries with
a thick bar.

Now, you may think this is an unnecessary
caution - but not long ago some high school
athletes were carrying a heavy log as part
of their workout - and something happened,
and the log fell, and it killed one of the kids.

Personally, I prefer to use thick bars for
deadlifts, curls, reverse curls and the
rectangular fix. I use a regular bar for
overhead work.

Use a power rack for thick bar bench
presses.


VERY IMPORTANT -- as in, life and death
important:

If you do thick bar bench presses, do them
in a power rack, with the pins set to catch the
bar if you drop it. A spotter won't be able to
catch a heavily loaded thick bar if it comes
crashing down suddenly.

And remember, I've seen experienced lifters
drop a regular bar on their chest - and that
was in a National Bench Press contest, with
two very experienced spotters - but it
happened so fast they couldn't catch the
bar.

So it can happen.

And do you remember the college football
player a few years ago - the one who dropped
a bar on his throat and almost died?

Not sure if that was a thick bar or not,
but again, it shows you what can happen.

Don't do thick bar dumbbell bench press
or incline press.


I would NOT do dumbbell bench press or
incline dumbbell bench press with thick-
handled dumbbells. Too easy to drop one,
and no way to catch it other than with your
teeth -- which would be bad.

And again, spotters may not be able to help.

Don't do double cleans or swings with
thick handled dumbbells.

If you do dumbbell cleans and swings with
a thick handled dumbbell, always use one
dumbbell at a time, so you can use your
non-lifting hand to help lower the
dumbbell.

It's very hard to hold onto a heavy
dumbbell when you lower it from above
your head or from your shoulder -- and
remember, your feet are directly beneath
the dumbbell. If you're holding a pair of
thick handled dumbbells, it is very
difficult to lower them safely.

I learned this when I cleaned a pair of
132 pound thick handled dumbbells. I'll
never forget the "What do I do now?"
thought that flashed through my mind
as I stood with the bells at my shoulders.

And that's it - unless you're thinking about
doing thick bar anything on roller-skates
or while standing on a Swiss ball - in which
case, you're on your own!

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a good
one.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. We're getting very close to the end of
the line for Strength, Muscle and Power -
and I'm not going to do another printing any
time soon - perhaps not ever - so if you want
a copy, grab it now:



http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:



Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html



Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: 

"Train hard, but train smart - and try
to avoid unnecessary injuries.


-- Brooks Kubik

BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:








































The Super Pressing Routine that Failed


Old-school weightlifters like Bernie Baron trained hard, heavy and progressively - and they did great - without using anything remotely like the modern-day super programs.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I often get questions from readers who ask
about the latest super program.

Usually it's a high volume workout -- and
often it involves daily training.

"Will it work?" they ask.

In response, let me share a story about a
good friend who used to do a super pressing
program many years ago.

He was a thick-boned mesomorph. What you
would call an easy gainer. And he had been
training for many years, and was very
experienced. If the program worked
for anyone, it should have worked for
him.

He got it directly from a leading expert. It
was a personalized training program. So he
thought it would be pretty good.

It was a special "Bulgarian style" pressing
program where you did a different pressing
movement every single day.

Leave aside the fact that the press was no
longer a part of Olympic weightlifting at this
point in time -- and the Bulgarian weightlifting
team didn't do daily pressing at that point in
time (if they had ever done it).

And forget about the number of Bulgarian
lifters who have been poped for PEDs.

The fans of "Bulgarian" training always
gloss over that.

But, anyhow . . . back to the story.

The super program went like this:

1. You trained six days a week.

2. You did military press in one workout --
incline press in another -- partial presses
in a third workout -- bench press in another
one -- and so on. You did multiple sets of
low to medium reps in all of your exercises.

3. You were supposed to be very sore at
first, but you were told to tough it out and
keep going -- and you were assured that
your muscles would "adapt" to the daily
training very quickly.

The idea was to hit the pressing muscles
from as many different angles as possible.

It was supposed to translate into big gains
in all of the different exercises -- including
the bench press, which was what my friend
was most interested in increasing.

My friend tried it, and got great results --
for a couple of weeks. I remember how he
raved about it. He felt like he had finally
found the answer to big gains.

Then he crashed and burned.

He got so stale he had to take a layoff --
and he ended up WEAKER than when he
started the program.

Amazingly, he tried it again a year later.

Same program.

Same result. Crash and burn and weaker
than when he started.

But a year later, he tried it again - for a
third time!

And the same thing happened.

And that's the problem with the super
programs.

My friend would have done MUCH BETTER
on a "slow-cooking" program that featured
abbreviated workouts and a slow but steady
progression system.

The workouts and progression systems in
Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 3,
would have been ideal for him.

They're not the latest thing, they're not
from Bulgaria, and they're not super duper.

Heck, they're not even super.

But they work.

And that's what counts.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Go here to grab Dinosaur Training
Secrets, Vol. 3, in your choice of hard-copy,
Kindle or PDF:



Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_03.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets3_kindle.html

PDF

See the list of PDF courses on our Products
Page (link below in PS 2).

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:



Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html



Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: 

"If a training program sounds too
good to be true, it usually is." 


-- Brooks Kubik


BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:






































The Passing of a Legend

We lost a great champion today.  Dedicate your next workout to his memory.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Bruno Sammartino passed away today
at the age of 82 - and that leaves all of
us in the Iron Game with a great big
lump in our throats.

Bruno Sammartino was an honest to
goodness, real life, rags to riches story.

He was born in Abbruzi, Italy back in
1935.

During World War Two, the family had to
hide in the hills to escape the Nazis. They
lived in a cave, and as you might imagine,
there was hardly anything to eat. They
often ate grass for dinner because that
was all they could find.

After the War, the family immigrated to
the United States. They ended up in a
tough neighborhood in Pittsburgh.

For young Bruno, that was better than living
in the cave -- but not much better. He was
terribly thin and painfully weak as a result
of the years of malnutrition during the War.

At age 14, he weighed 95 pounds.

That's not good when you're an immigrant
kid living in a tough part of town.

So Bruno started lifting weights.

Later, as he grew stronger, he began wrestling.

The training program worked.

At age 21, he weighed 265 pounds, with 20
inch arms and a 56 inch chest. He could bench
press 565 pounds -- which was a World record
back then.

He went into professional wrestling, and in
short order he won the WWWF Heavyweight
Championship of the World. He held the title
for many years.

In 1961, Bruno wrote a short course called
"The Bruno Course of Bodybuilding."

I saw an ad for it in a wrestling magazine
when I was 11 years old, and promptly
mailed in my two bucks to buy the little
monster. It was a good little course,
and I still have it.

Bruno recommended short workouts focusing
on the basic exercises: squats, bench presses,
curls, etc. Three or four sets of six reps on
each. Training with weights three times per
week. Doing some simple bodyweight
exercises on two other days.

Nothing earth-shattering -- but it worked.

He even touched on the mental aspect of
training.

"Have confidence in yourself!" he wrote.
"Concentrate on the fact that you are going to
succeed and make the gains in physique and
strength that you want. Again I repeat --
never, never get discouraged."

"The reason I made my sensational gains and
went from 95 pounds at age 14 to 265 pounds
at age 21  . . . was that I concentrated on
making my goal. I stuck it out and actually
that is my secret!"

Many years later, I sent some of my own books
to Bruno. He sent me an autographed photo with
a handwritten note.

It says:

"To Brooks Kubik,

Wishing you the best of health, best wishes
always, and keep pushing that weight.

Yours in strength,

Bruno Sammartino"

Yep. He signed off by saying "Yours in strength."

Just like I do in all of my emails.

Now I guess you know where that comes from.

And now, Bruno has left us -- and the Iron
Game has witnessed the passing of a true
champion.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one -- in memory of Bruno.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

The No. 1 Question About Thick Bars

Herman Goerner may have had the strongest grip of any man who ever lived. He built it with plenty of specialized exercises.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes and then we'll talk iron.

1. The John Wood Report

Have you read issue no. 2 of The John
Wood Report?

It's a monster-sized, 19 page issue, in PDF
format so you can get it instantly - and yes,
it's printable, so you can print it and save it.

It has some great articles and training tips.

Tips on building pressing power, some fun
push-up challenges, cool workouts, a primer
on the reverse curl, some ab flattening tips,
special gut exercises and - get this - the
Hammer Man's Challenge to the World.

Go here to grab the the little monster:

https://www.oldtimestrongman.com/johnwoodreport-02.html

If you missed issue no. 1, it's right here:

https://www.oldtimestrongman.com/johnwoodreport-01.html

2. The Dino Files



The March issue of The Dinosaur Files is
getting great reviews. If you don't have it
yet, here's the link for the downloadable
and printable PDF:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-files-march2018pdf.html

And if you missed the October, Nov, Dec
Jan or Feb issues, go here to grab them so
you have the complete set:

Feb issue

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-files-february2018pdf.html

Oct, Nov, Dec and Jan issues

http://brookskubik.com/dinosaur_files.html

By then way - the March issue includes the
toughest leg training program in the world -
as well as the simplest bodyweight training
workout in the world - some special tips on
healthy joints for older Dinos - and a really
great article about how one of our longtime
Dinos has been battling back from cancer
surgery. Very good stuff - informative, and
inspiring!

3. The No. 1 Question About Thick Bars

Ever since I published Dinosaur Training
back in 1996, I've been buried in questions
from readers.

One of the most common questions involves
thick bars and how to use them. And there's
one question that I get pretty much all the
time.

Here's how one reader phrased it:

"I train self defense 3x a week. I train bodyweight
exercises 2x a week. I do heavy iron once a week
(one movement, such as squats or Trap Bar DL).

I'm currently on your suggested 5 x 5 and hope
to work my way down to singles as you prescribe
in your book. My question is around thick bars.

Should I just focus on overall strength and on
adding as much weight as possible to the bar?

Or should I switch to thick bar right now, build
the grip from day one, and sacrifice poundage?"

In other words , the reader is asking if he should
do Trap Bar deadlifts with as much weight as he
can handle -- or do thick bar deadlifts with much
less weight to train his grip?

Some readers phrase it like this:

"I want to do thick bar training, but I can't use
enough weight on thick bar deadlifts to work my
legs, hips and back hard enough -- so what do I
do?"

As I said, that's a VERY common question. I get
it at least once a week.

Luckily, there's a very simple answer.

Do this:

1. Train your deadlift or Trap Bar deadlift (or
any other pulling exercise) with a regular-sized
bar, and pile on the weight to build total body
strength and power.

2. At the end of your workout, use the thick
bar for thick bar deadlifts or timed holds or what-
ever else you feel like doing. You won't be able
to use as much weight, but that's fine. You're
not doing the exercise to build all-around
strength and power -- rather, you're using
it to build grip strength.

Thus, you do your deadlifts TWICE -- with
two different bars -- at two different places
in your workout.

It's not either/or. It's not one or the other. It's
both.

Whenever I write programs, I give the basic
exercises to do -- and then I close by saying
"gut, grip and neck work of your choice." The
"grip work of your choice" at the end of the
workout is is where to use the thick bar.

And before you can ask, "Won't I over-train
my back?" - the answer is NO - because you
won't be using a heavy weight in the thick
bar work.

Also, you do NOT need to do a ton of thick
bar deadlifts to get a good grip workout.

A little bit of heavy grip work with
a thick
handled barbell or dumbbell
goes a very long way.


Work in three to five sets at the end of
your workout -- and keep it up for a year
or two -- and you'll look have Popeye
forearms.

And that's the answer to the no. 1 question
about thick bar training.

As always, thanks for reading, and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik



P.S. 1. My new  Dinosaur Training courses
are selling like hotcakes -- and getting rave
reviews from Dinos.

There are three of the little monsters so far --
 and they're available in your choice of
hard-copy, PDF or Kindle e-book.

Here are the links for all three -- hard-copy
first, and then the Kindle e-book. The PDF
links are easy to find in the PDF section of
our products page, which is listed in PS 2
below.



Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 1.
"Exercises, Workouts and Training
Programs"

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

Kindle

http://brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets01_kindle.html



Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 2,
"How Strong Are You?"

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_02.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets2_kindle.html



Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 3,
"How to Use Old-School Progression
Methods for Fast and Steady Gains in
Strength, Muscle and Power"

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_03.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets3_kindle.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:



Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html



Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day:

"The only way to get the answer is to
ask the question."


- Brooks Kubik

BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others: