What's Your Favorite Piece of Training Equipment?

The garage gym at our old house was probably my best gym ever. If this were all the equipment I had, I'd be darn happy. (The squat stands are off to the side - out of the frame. Squat stands are always a good thing.)    


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We'll talk iron in just a minute, but first
of all, let me cover two quick updates.

1. Brooks Kubik's Old-School
Strength Q and A, Vol. 1


We launched a great little book on
Kindle a few weeks ago. It's a series
of training questions from readers -
with my answers to them.

This is just like sitting down and
having a good talk about training -
a talk where you could ask me
anything and everything, and
I'd tell you.

This is vol. 1 in a new series - and,
guess what - I'm almost done with
vol. 2! I think they're going to be a
very good resource for you.

You can find the little monster right
here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/oldschool_01-kindle.html

2. The Dinosaur Strength Training
Notebook, Vol. 1

This is another new release on
Kindle. It's a collection of training
tips, ideas, thoughts, commentary,
workouts, advice, suggestions,
stories, iron game history and
all-around fun stuff for Iron
Slingers.

This also is vol. 1 in a series of
volumes - and it's going to give
you a huge amount of training
information.

Go here to grab the first volume
on Kindle:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurnotebook001.html

3. What's Your Single Favorite Piece of
Training Equipment?

The "What's your favorite exercise?" question
is a popular one at discussion boards, but
here's another fun question:

"What's your single favorite piece of training
equipment?"

Meaning, if you were stuck on a desert island
somewhere (think Tom Hanks in Castaway),
what's the one piece of equipment you would
want the most?

For me, it would be a plate-loading barbell --
although in keeping with the desert island
theme, I can see the merit of an old globe
barbell that you could fill with sand.

No, on second thought, I'll stick to the plate
loading barbell. Faster and easier to change
the weight.

Other people might have different ideas. I
imagine that some Dinos would like a Trap
Bar more than anything else -- or a pair of
adjustable dumbbells -- or a pair of
kettlebells. (I think a pair of dumbbells
or kettlebells counts as one item.)

And I suppose we could change the question
and let you choose your TWO favorite pieces
of training equipment -- or even your THREE
favorite pieces of equipment.

If you had THREE choices, what would they
be?

For me, it would be:

1. Olympic barbell and bumper
plates


a. Actually, if you were on a desert
island, iron plates would work as
well as bumper plates.

b. Especially if you trained in the sand.

2. Adjustable squat stands or a
power
rack

a. Of course, you could always rig
something up with trees, branches,
and rope (or vines) if you were on
a desert island.

3. Lifting platform

a. Again, if you trained out on a sandy
beach, this might not be necessary.

Of course, I focus on Olympic lifting now,
so my choices reflect that. If I were doing
powerlifting or basic strength and power
training, I'd choose a barbell, power rack
and a bench.

What would you choose?

Shoot me an email, and let me know! I'll
share the answers in a future email.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Dinosaur Training: Lost Secrets of
Strength
and Development is 21 years
old this year -- and it's still going strong.
If you don't have a copy, grab one now:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_training.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Wherever
you
train, and whatever equipment
you use,
make the most of it."
-- Brooks Kubik



If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html



"Are Five Work Sets Too Much?" He Asked

Three-time Mr. Universe Reg Park pioneered the 5 x 5 system and used it for much of his career.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk iron.

1. Follow Me On Instagram!

I'm posting a ton of photos and videos
On Instagram now - including some fun
photos of Trudi's solo vacation up in the
Pacific Northwest.

You can find me right here:

https://www.instagram.com/brooks_kubik/

2.The Dinosaur Strength Training
Notebook, Vol. 1

This little monster is our newest edition to
the Kindle bookstore, and it's been selling
like crazy. Go here to grab a copy:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurnotebook001.html

3. "Are Five Work Sets Too Much?"
He Asked


I just got an email from a reader who says he
does 5 x 5, using five work sets for each
exercise.

He wondered if that was too much.
Short answer: Yes, it's probably too much
work -- but, like anything else, it depends on
several different factors -- and it will probably
change for you over time.

Many trainees get very good results from ONE
work set. They find that they over-train if they
perform more than one work set -- especially in
exercises like squats and deadlifts.

Other trainees do well with TWO or even THREE
work sets. But three is the limit for most trainees,
unless they're doing very low reps (singles,
doubles or triples).

As a general rule, older trainees do better with
fewer work sets -- and stronger, more advanced
trainees do better with fewer work sets. So what
works best for you may change over time.

If you do five work sets, you need to follow
an ultra-abbreviated training program. Limit
yourself to one or two exercises per workout.
You won't be able to do justice to more than
that.

And here's a thought: If one, two or three work
sets do the job for you, why do more than that?
As always, thanks for reading and have a great
day. If you train today, make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. For more straight talk on sets, reps and real,
world, no-nonsense strength training, grab
Dinosaur Training Secrets, Vol. 1:

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

Kindle

http://brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets01_kindle.html

PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets_vol1_digital.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:
Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Why do MORE
when LESS works just as well -- or maybe
even better?" -- Brooks Kubik

If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html




Now In 11 Top 10 Lists World Wide!

 
The Dinosaur Strength Training Notebook, Vol. 1, has been selling like hotcakes all around the world. We're currently in 11 top 10 lists in the Kindle bookstore.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I launched my new book in the
Amazon Kindle bookstore at
midnight on Monday morning.

The title is The Dinosaur
Strength Training Notebook,
Vol. 1, and it's been doing
really well.

It's a collection of blog posts I
did back in 1997 - when the
Internet had just gotten going -
and it has a ton of training tips,
workouts, exercises, stories,
motivation and all-around fun
stuff.

I've revised, expanded and
updated the blog posts - and
included some commentary
where necessary - and the
end result is pretty darn
good, if I say so myself.

Dinos around the world seem
to agree. They've been
snatching it up like hotcakes.

Get this --

The little monster is now in 11
top 10 lists world wide.

We're in three lists in Canada -
currently no. 2, 3 and 3.

We're no. 2 on one list and
no. 10 in another in Germany.

We're in three top 10 lists in
Italy - tied with Canada at no.
2, 3 and 3.

And we're in three top 10 lists
in Germany - currently at
no. 7, 7 and 8.

And we're no. 13 in Australia,
so with any luck, that will move
up into the top 10 there as well.

Of course, I'm still looking for a
no. 1 ranking - so if you've been
sitting on the fence, jump off and
join your fellow Dinos around the
world - and help us jump into the
no. 1 spot.

Go here to grab your copy:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurnotebook001.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik



Weight Training and Brain Health

Hitting it hard at age 60. The older you are, the more important your training becomes.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Back in the day, people who lifted weights
were called "muscle-heads."

It wasn't because people thought they were
smart. It was because weightlifters and body-
builders were viewed as "all brawn and no
brain."

This view was so common that one reporter
actually had the audacity to ask World weight-
lifting champion Doug Hepburn the following
question during an interview:

"How does it feel to be all brawn and no
brains?"


To which Hepburn famously replied:

 "I don't know -- what's it like to be neither?"

But not very long ago, there was a report
of a study that measured the effect of weight
training on the brain.

Our brains contain something called "white
matter," which connects the different parts
of the brain and allows them to communicate
with one another.

As we grow older, we often begin to develop
gaps or holes in the white matter -- which in
turn affects our ability to process information.

Thus, we may have trouble remembering things,
concentrating, or even thinking.

The holes in the white matter also affect our
balance, coordination and mobility.

Now, frankly, that sounds pretty terrible --
but hold on, because the new study gives us
plenty of hope.

Regular weight training is one of the most important keys to healthy aging.


The recent study compared three groups of
women between the ages of 65 and 75.

One group did light weight training once a
week.

Another group did light weight training twice
a week.

The third group did stretching and special
balance training twice a week.

The researchers performed brain scans on the
women before they began their programs --
and repeated the scans one year later.

The results were shocking -- at least, they were
shocking to the researchers.

The women who trained with weights once a
week, and the women who did balance training,
had significant deterioration of the white matter
in their brains after the year of training had
passed.

The women who did weight training twice a week
had much less deterioration of their white matter.
They also walked and moved much better than
the other women.

The researchers concluded that training with
weights twice a week or more has some sort of
beneficial effect on the brain. In essence, it builds
the brain just as much as it builds the body.

The iron adds years to your life, and life to your years.


The researchers don't know the exact mechanism
by which weight training strengthens the brain.
It may be that the same chemical and hormonal
changes that cause muscle growth also cause
the growth of the white matter in the brain.

Or it may be related to improved blood flow to
the brain as a result of the training.

But whatever the exact growth mechanism, the
bottom line is this:

Weight training makes your brain stronger,
younger and healthier.

All brawn and no brain?

I don't think so.

In fact, we may be moving toward a time when
regular weight training is recognized as one of
the very best things we can do to keep our brains
healthy and strong.

And yes, that's a very important reason to start
training when you're young -- and to keep on
training for your entire life!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. For maximum benefit, focus on the mind-muscle
link when you train. I cover this in detail in Dinosaur
Bodyweight Training:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_bodyweight.html

The exercises in Dinosaur Dumbbell Training are
also great for brain and body health -- particularly the
compound movements:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_dumbbelltraining.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Weights
for your body, weights for your brain."
 -- Brooks Kubik


If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html




No, It's Not a Training Journal!

Yes, that's a 151-pound dumbbell. And if we were training together, I'd teach you how to do this.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

A guy sent an email saying, "The
new Dinosaur Strength Training
Notebook looks real nice - but I
don't need it because I already
have a training journal."

To which I replied --

well, I didn't reply.

I didn't know what to say.

Or how to say it.

And I do try not to use excessive
profanity.

It's not a training journal.

It's called a notebook because it's
a notebook of training tools and
training ideas.

Back in the early 1950s, Harry
did three nifty little editions of
what he called Bosco's Strength
Notebook.

The Dinosaur Strength Training
Notebook is the same sort of thing.

It's not a book, per se.

It's a collection of thoughts.

Of ideas.

Of things to try.

Things that work.

And warnings about things that
don't work.

The best way to think about it is
this:

If we were training together, you'd
ask me all kinds of questions.

"Why do you do that way?"

"What about this?"

"Is this okay?"

"I was reading about [fill in the
blank]- what do YOU thing about
it?"

"What's the best thing for [fill in the
blank]?"

"How do you [fill in the blank]?"

"How can I increase my [fill in the
blank]?"

And so on.

You'd ask me a ton of questions -
and I'd give you a ton of answers.

Or maybe a couple of tons of
answers.

When it was all over, you'd know a
heck of a lot about productive
training - including things that
many people never even dream
of.

That's what the Dinosaur Strength
Training Notebook is.

It's like having me as your training
partner.

I don't know about you, but that
sounds like a good deal to me.

So grab your lifting gear and your
chalk - and let's get ready to train:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurnotebook001.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. We're only releasing The Dinosaur
Strength Training Notebook in a Kindle
edition - so don't wait for PDF or hard-
copy. Grab it now. And remember - you
can download a FREE app from Amazon
that let's you read Kindle books on any
device.

Take a Peek Inside!

Louis Abele once said that he trained so hard on squats and weightlifting exercises that even his teeth ached after a workout. That's the kind of old-school training mojo I teach in The Dinosaur Strength Training Notebook, Vol. 1 - the newest addition to our library of strength training books on Kindle.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Take a peek at the table of
contents for The Dinosaur
Strength Training Notebook,
Vol. 1:

Introduction by John Wood

(Note: This is a GREAT intro -
a big THANK YOU to John for
writing it.)

Brooks Kubik – The Original
Dinosaur

Introduction to the Second
Edition

1. The Supplement Mindset

2. Quiet Confidence

3. The Success Habit

4. A Little Rant from Peary Rader

5. Ten Things that Work Much Better
than Any Food Supplement Under
the Sun

6. The Entourage

7. First, Last and Foremost –
Squat!

8. Motivation

9. Irregular Training

10. An Iron Will

11. Strength Training 101

12. “How Much Can You Bench
Press?”

13. The Vertical Bar Lift

14. Dinosaur Style Dumbbell
Training

15. “Yes, It Really Is 12:15 in the
Morning.”

And much more - because
there's a grand total of 50
chapters - some short, some
not so short.

It gives you workouts, exercises,
mind power, training tips,
stories, motivation, and a no-
nonsense, take no prisoners
barrage of old-school Iron
Slinging "how to do it"
advice and instruction.

It's available on Kindle - right
now, and right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurnotebook001.html

I'm very happy to bring this
little monster to you - and I
think you're really going to
like it!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html             

The Dinosaur Strength Training Notebook

video

I'm hitting some power snatches at Dino Headquarters to celebrate the release of our new Dinosaur Training book on Kindle.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

As longtime Dinos may recall,
I did a little book called The
Dinosaur Strength Training
Notebook way back in 1998.


It was very popular and I
sold a ton of copies.


But it's been out of print
for a long time - perhaps
10 or 12 years. Maybe
longer.


Anyhow, a number of you
have asked me to bring it
back - so we did -  in an
updated, expanded, and
revised version.


You can grab it at the
Kindle bookstore - right
here:


http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurnotebook001.html

Let me know how you
like the little monster!


Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik


Breaking News - Here It Is - My New Dinosaur Training Book on Kindle!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Here it is - the new Dinosaur
Training book available in the
Kindle bookstore:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurnotebook001.html

And right on time, too - I
thought it would be available
around midnight, and it
went live at 11:58 p.m.

Hope you enjoy it!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik



Be Looking for It Right Around Midnight!

We're launching something new and fun on Kindle right around midnight - I don't have the link yet, but here's a list of all of my Kindle e-books. If the list updates when the new book goes live, then you can be one of the first Dinos to grab the new addition to our Kindle library.

 http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html



Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We have something new and
exciting for you in the Kindle
bookstore.

Well, not yet - but VERY SOON.

Right now, it's being uploaded
into the Kindle system.

So you can't see it right now
(9:42 pm EST as I type this) -
but it should be available right
around midnight.

If not then, then sometime
early tomorrow morning.

I'll send an email as soon as
it's up and I have a link - but
in the meantime, you might
try searching my name in
the Kindle bookstore.

Or try this:

If you click on some of the sales
pages for different Brooks Kubik
books in the Kindle bookstore,
Amazon may very well send you
a notice when the new little
monster is ready to go.

One of those "Hey, if you're
interested in books by Brooks
Kubik, you might like this"
notices.

If that happens, you may be one
of the very first Dinos to grab the
new little monster - which is
always fun to do.

Of course, if all else fails, look for
my next email. It will have the
link.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

12:00 Midnight 

Breaking news! 

Here it is!

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Here it is - the new Dinosaur
Training book available in the
Kindle bookstore:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurnotebook001.html


And right on time, too - I
thought it would be available
around midnight, and it
went live at 11:58 p.m.

Hope you enjoy it!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik



The "Where's Trudi?" Contest

Can you find Trudi? She shot this photo two days ago - somewhere in the Pacific Northwest.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

As you probably know, Trudi is
Mrs. Kubik.

I married her a little over a dozen
years ago. Smartest thing I ever did,
even including barbell training.

Anyhow, last week Trudi did some-
thing she's never done before.

She set off to have an adventuire.
In other words, an all by herself
vacation.

And she didn't plan any of it, other
than where to begin.

She flew into Seattle, stayed with
friends on Whidbey Island - and
then flipped a coin - heads for
east and tails for west - and
then took off.

I've been following her adventures
as she sends photos and video.

Right now she's - heck, I don't know
where she is.

I'm not even sure what country she's
in.

It could be the USA - or it could be
Canada.

But I'm posting her photos and
videos on my Instagram page -
so head on over and check it out -
and follow the clues and see if
you can figure out where she's
been, and where she's going
next.

My Instagram page is right here:

https://www.instagram.com/brooks_kubik/?hl=en

The hashtag is (of course):

#travelswithtrudi

We'll even make it into a little
contest.

If you think you know where she is
(or was) on any given day, leave a
comment on the Instagram page.

There's no prize, but I'll keep track
and announce THE WINNER once
Trudi gets back home.

I mean, IF she comes back home . . .

It's pretty awesome out there, and she
just may stay.

So go ahead, check it out, and
take a guess or two.

By the way - here's a clue:

1. Debra Winger

2. Richard Gere

3. Louis Gossett, Jr.

Yours in strength

Brooks Kubik



A Shout Out and a Thank You!

John Wood's new book raced up to THREE No. 1 spots in the Kindle bookstore - and that's pretty darn amazing.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I want to give a shout out
to my buddy, John Wood.
Two days ago, John released
a great little book on Kindle:

John Wood's Old-School
Strength Articles, Vol. 1.

This morning, I checked the
Kindle rankings and the new
book was ranked No. 1 in
three different categories!

That's pretty darn impressive,
but the book's pretty darn
good.

It covers tons of stuff: power
rack training, isometrics, mind
power for weightlifting and
training tips on Olympic
weightlifting from an old-
timer named Doug Hepburn
who just happens to be a
(get this) self-taught, self-
coached WORLD
CHAMPION.


Anyhow, three no. 1 rankings
is pretty amazing.

I also wanted to say THANK
YOU to everyone who stepped
up and grabbed a copy.

I know John appreciates it,
and so do I.

If you missed the news earlier,
you can go ahead and grab the
little monster right now:

http://www.oldtimestrongman.com/oldschoolarticles001.html

And, of course, please post a
review after you read the book.
The reviews really help.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik


10 Reasons for Older Dinos to Keep on Training

 
Hitting it hard at age 60 - and having tons of fun doing it.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I was talking with a guy I used to
work with but haven't seen for a
number of years.

He asked me if I was still training.
The answer, of course, is "Yes, I am --
three times a week, as regular as
clockwork."

"But aren't you getting a little old for this
weightlifting stuff?" he asked.

"I'm older, but training keeps me young,"
I told him.

"How old are you?"

"I'm 60."

And that's when I got the "are you kidding
me?" looks.  That's because I don't look 60.
Which is part of what I mean about weight
training keeping you young.

Bob Hoffman was saying this back in the 1930's,
but scientists, physicians and everyone else didn't
believe him. In fact, the conventional wisdom back
then was that weight training would probably kill
you.

Everyone other than Bob Hoffman and a small
handful of others told you NOT to do it.

As in, NEVER.

Not under ANY circumstances.

Bob Hoffman was right - weight training keeps you young!


And that anti-weight training bias lasted a very
long time. It was still around when I was in high
school. Many of the coaches refused to let their
athletes train with weights. They thought it would
ruin them.

But recent research has established that Hoffman
was right.

Weight training -- or any kind of progressive
strength training -- is good for you. It keeps
you strong, fit and healthy at any age. And it's
probably the best thing around for older adults.
Recent research has confirmed the following:

1. Progressive weight training increases bone
density and bone strength in older adults.

2. Progressive weight training improves balance,
mobility and coordination in older adults.

3. Muscular strength is associated with a 30 to
40 percent decrease in cancer mortality among
older men.

4. Progressive strength training improves brain
function in older adults.

6. Muscle mass is associated with healthy aging
and lower mortality in older men -- and weight
training helps you build or maintain muscle mass
at any age.

7. Progressive strength training stimulates your
body's production of male hormones -- and
maintaining high levels of male hormones helps
keep you young, strong, vigorous and healthy.

In other words, the medical world is discovering
"what Iron Slingers have known for many years --
and what Bob Hoffman wrote about back in the
1930's:

Progressive strength training is the best
thing in the world for older adults.

So give yourself a pat on the back for having
figured this out before the science honchos --
and keep on training!

It doesn't take much to stay in great shape at any age - a barbell and a place to lift it is a complete gym.


Oh, and before I forget, here are three more
reasons to keep on hitting the iron:

8. It's fun.

9. It makes you feel better.

10. It makes you younger and stronger --
because strength is life, and stronger is
younger.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Gray Hair and Black Iron is the best book
ever written on effective strength training for
anyone in the age 35 and up category:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

I also did a terrific mini-course with an all-new
workout for older trainees. It's available in PDF
with immediate electronic download:

http://www.brookskubik.com/minicourse_01.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Lifting iron
keeps you from rusting away." -- Brooks
Kubik


If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html



Look What Raced Up to No. 1!



Hail to the Dinosaurs!

If you missed the BIG
NEWS, John Wood's
new book raced up to
No. 1 in its category in
the Kindle bookstore -
in less than 24 hours!

It's also in the no. 3 spot
on two other top 10 lists.

So I guess old-school
training is alive and well -
which is a very good thing.

It's called OLD-SCHOOL
STRENGTH ARTICLES,
VOL. I.

Go here to grab the little
monster - and be sure to
post a review after you
read it:

http://www.oldtimestrongman.com/oldschoolarticles001.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik


John Wood's Old School Strength Articles, Vol. 1





Hail to the Dinosaurs!

My buddy John Wood just
released a terrific little book
on Kindle.

It's called OLD-SCHOOL
STRENGTH ARTICLES,
VOL. I.

It includes FOUR great
articles from Peary Rader's
old Iron Man magazine:

1. An article by Tony Ditillo
on power rack training.

2. A special "field report"
on isometric training.

3. A very interesting article
on mind power.

and (get this)

4. An article by Doug
Hepburn about training for
the Olympic lifts.

So that's four killer articles,
together in one little book
with a knock-out cover -
and guess what . . .

the little monster costs a
mere 99 cents!

No, that's not a typo: it's
one penny less than one
measly buck.

I'm not very good at math,
but I think that works out to
something like less than 25
cents per article.

And that's  a pretty good
deal.

Go here to grab the little
monster - and be sure to
post a review after you
read it:

http://www.oldtimestrongman.com/oldschoolarticles001.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik


Seven Strength and Conditioning Tips

video
 The power clean and push press has great value for strength and conditioning workouts.



Hail to the Dinosaurs!

For the last couple of days, we've
been talking about ways to increase
the conditioning value of your regular
weight training workouts, and it has
reminded me of some good tips from
Bradley J. Steiner.

Steiner used to write for Peary Rader's
old Iron Man magazine when I was a
kid. He was my favorite Iron Game
author by far -- and ranks as one of
the most popular and most influential
Iron Game authors of all time.

Steiner taught self-defence, and used
his strength training workouts to help
his martial arts training and enhance
his self-defense skills. So he always
focused on ways to make you strong,
fit, and rugged -- and ready for
anything that might happen!

Steiner liked to integrate some basic
conditioning work into his barbell and
dumbbell workouts.

Here are some of the things he did to
maximize the conditioning value of his
strength training workouts:

1. Steiner liked to begin and end his
workouts with two or three "rounds" of
double-unders with the jump-rope. This
is a staple of training for boxers, and it's
an excellent conditioner. It also doubles
as a warm-up and a warm-down.

Use a high-quality leather jump rope --
the kind that boxers use.

Each "round" should last two or three
minutes. Start at 30 seconds and work
up.

2. Steiner liked to include some sort of
all-out exercise, such as power cleans,
power snatches, or the clean and press.

Doing 5 x 5 in the clean and press is
a great conditioner -- as well as a terrific
strength and power builder. You can use
a barbell or two dumbbells. Do one clean
and one press on every rep.

This was taken from the old York Training
courses -- in particular, the "repetition
weightlifting exercises" of course no. 3.

3. Steiner always included leg work, i.e.,
squats or front squats, which have plenty
of conditioning value.

We always think of 20 rep squats when
we think of conditioning workouts, but
any number of reps will have some degree
of conditioning value.

4. Steiner always followed the squat with
the breathing pull-over to help expand the
rib-cage and get your breathing back to
normal.

In essence, this was a deep breathing
exercise.

Note that you use LIGHT dumbbells for
pullovers. It's not a muscle builder or a
strength movement -- it's a breathing
exercise.

5. Steiner included stiff-legged deadlifts
in most of his workouts. Like the squat,
the stiff-legged deadlift has plenty of
conditioning value.

6. Steiner urged trainees to train at a
fairly fast pace, and to keep their rest
times to a minimum. You didn't rush
things or race the clock, but you
worked at a steady pace and didn't
waste any time.

7. To maximize point no. 6, Steiner
suggested that you try to cut 10 or 15
minutes off your total training time --
while performing the same exercises,
sets and reps.

Doing a 60 minute workout in 50 minutes
means that you're resting much less, and
ensures that you maximize the conditioning
value of your workout.

So there you have it -- seven training tips
from Bradley J. Steiner -- and seven ways
to maximize the conditioning value of your
strength training workouts.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day.  If you train today, make it a
good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. See Gray Hair and Black Iron for more
ideas on how to combine strength training
and conditioning in a single workout:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html


Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Simple
changes
can have profound benefits."
-- Brooks Kubik



If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html



The Man Who Sprinted Up the Rocky Mountains!

Long before "cardio" training, weightlifters were using barbells and dumbbells to build a terrific combination of strength, power, muscle mass and physical condition.  


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Many years ago, a man who lived in
Alliance, Nebraska went on vacation
way out in the rugged Colorado
Rockies.

His name was Peary Rader. He was the
founder, editor and publisher of the old
Iron Man magazine.

Back home in Nebraska, there were few
opportunities to climb mountains -- and
certainly no opportunity to climb
anything remotely like the Rocky
Mountains.

But to his surprise, Peary found that he
was as fast and nimble as a mountain
goat.

He literally ran up the side of some of the
steep slopes, leaving his friends far behind
him as they trudged slowly and doggedly
up the trail.

He also discovered that he had tremendous
endurance.

He could climb mountains all day without
feeling tired -- and when he woke up the
next morning, he was ready for more!

Now, you might ask if he did a lot of
running back home to get ready for
the trip.

Surprisingly, he did none at all.

You might wonder if he did some sort of
intense cardio training -- perhaps riding
a bicycle?

Again, he did none at all.

Or long walks?

Nope.

Or you might think he was on some kind
of special, six-day a week, high volume
training program to build maximum work
capacity.

Again, the answer is no.

Peary trained just twice a week, using a
simple program and a small number of
basic exercises.

His primary exercise was the squat.

He did one set of 20 reps with all the
weight he could handle.

He did breathing squats -- meaning that
he took several huge, enormous breaths
in-between every rep. He breathed so hard
the plates rattled on the bar.

He used the breathing squat program as
a way of gaining muscular bodyweight
and strength. It worked great. In his first
two years on the program, he gained
close to 100 pounds of muscle -- and
went on to be a regional weightlifting
champion for several years.

But the squats also gave him tremendous
endurance. The trip to the Rocky Mountains
proved it.

It's another example of what we talked about
yesterday -- using your weight training to
build a superb combination of strength,
power and endurance.

Yes, you can get a great conditioning workout
and build tremendous stamina and endurance
with your barbell workouts.

Peary Rader proved it.

For details about specialized leg and back
programs to build strength, muscle and
outstanding condition, grab a copy of
Chalk and Sweat. It has 50 terrific
workouts, and they'll get you into
great shape faster than you can say
"mountain goat!":

http://www.brookskubik.com/chalk_and_sweat.html

And for special instruction on how to ease
into your squatting program and make
steady progress with old-fashioned "slow
cooking", grab Dinosaur Training Secrets,
Vol. 3. It's available in hard-copy, Kindle
or PDF with immediate electronic delivery:

Hard-copy edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_03.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets3_kindle.html

PDF with electronic delivery

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets_vol3_digital.html

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. My other books and courses are right
here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day: "Strong is
good, but strong and well-conditioned
is better." -- Brooks Kubik


If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html



Did Reg Park Do Cardio?

 
England's Reg Park was a muscular marvel - and he was just as strong as he looked!


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

If you're a regular reader, you know
about Reg Park.

Famous old-school bodybuilder from
England.

Three time Mr. Universe.

Two hundred and thirty-five pounds
of massive muscle.

Played Hercules in the movies --
-- and looked more like Hercules
than Hercules did.

Strong, too. Park squatted 600 pounds
back when the top heavyweight lifters
didn't handle much more than that --
used 300 pounds in the press behind
neck (some say for reps!) -- set a
British record in the two dumbbell
clean and press -- and was the second
man in history (behind Doug Hepburn)
to bench press 500 pounds.

So I ask the question:

Did Reg Park do cardio?

And like many things in life, the answer
is "Yes!" -- and -- "No!"

If you're talking about endless hours on
a treadmill, jogging 20 or 30 miles a week,
daily spinning classes, power aerobics,
jazzercize, jumpercize or cardio theater,
the answer is "No, he did not!"

In fact, none of the champions from
Park's era did any kind of what we now
call "cardio."

But if you count hard, heavy workouts
where you train fast and furious with
heavy weights, then the answer is,
"Yes, he did!"

A gym owner named Ray Beck watched
Park train back in the 1950's. He wrote
about it in Peary Rader's old Iron Man
magazine. He said, "Nobody, but nobody,
works out as fast and furiously  . . . as
Reg Park."

Of course, that does NOT mean that Park
trained fast and sloppy or that he never
rested -- or that he handled light wights
in his workouts.

He trained on the basics, using low and
medium reps, and piled on the iron. He
trained with intense concentration and
ferocious determination. He performed
all of his reps in perfect form. He was a
stickler for details, and he squeezed
everything possible out of every set.

But he also trained fast -- meaning
that he kept his rest between sets to
a minimum, and he didn't waste any
time.

In other words, he was not "racing the
clock" -- but he was working as fast as
he could, while still paying full justice
to each and every set.

And when you're training hard and heavy
on the basic exercises, that kind of fast
and furious pace will give your heart and
lungs a terrific workout. It also will kick
your metabolism into high gear and help
you stay lean, hard and muscular.

You do NOT need to do conventional
"cardio" to be strong, muscular and well
conditioned. You can do it with the iron.
You just need to train the right way. You
need to train like Reg Park: hard, heavy,
fast and furious.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. I cover strength training and muscle
building workouts that double as great
conditioning workouts in many of my
books and courses, including:

Dinosaur Training: Lost Secrets of
Strength and Development

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_training.html

Chalk and Sweat

http://www.brookskubik.com/chalk_and_sweat.html

Dinosaur Dumbbell Training

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_dumbbelltraining.html

Dinosaur Bodyweight Training

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_bodyweight.html

Gray Hair and Black Iron

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

Strength, Muscle and Power

http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Squats are
cardio for guys and gals who like to move
heavy iron." -- Brooks Kubik


If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html







Grab Them While You Can!

 
Bill Hinbern's modern reprints of old-school books and courses are one of the very best resources for authentic, real life, old-school training and lifting.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I just want to give you a
quick heads up.

My buddy Bill Hinbern is
almost completely out of
stock for two great books
on old-time training - and
he's not going to reprint
them.

So this is "last chance to
get them" time.

The books are by W. A.
Pullam, the famed "Wizard
of the Weightlifting World."

They're two of the very
best guides ever written
about how to perform the
old-school lifts - and about
how the old-timers trained.

The titles are:

1. Weightlifting Made Easy
and Interesting

and

2. How to Use a Barbell

Right now, you can grab
them right here:

http://superstrengthtraining.com/william-pullum

But as I said, there aren't
many left - and when they're
gone, they're gone.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik




If It's Working, Keep On Doing It!

video
 Old-school, split style snatches keep me strong and fast at age 60 - and they're fun to do.

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

At least once a week I get an email from a
reader who's doing something that's working
well for him -- meaning that he's making good
gains in strength and muscle, recovering from
his workouts and enjoying his training -- but
then he sees something on the Interwebs
and it makes him think he should change
his program and do something different.

It's usually one of two things:

1. Something new and different that might
be better than what he's doing now -- often
being the workout of a current champion.

2. A blog post, article or forum discussion
telling him that what he's doing "doesn't
work."

Most of the time it's number two -- which
is surprising, because the immediate
response should be, "It works GREAT -
so shut up already!"

But written words are powerful, and
they often make us second-guess
ourselves.

So our trainee -- the one who is making
good gains and having lots of fun in his
workouts -- starts to second-guess
himself.

And he sends me an email and asks what
he should do.

As I said, this happens at least once a
week. Luckily, as questions go, it's an
easy one.

The answer is always the same:

"If it's working, keep on doing it. If your
gains slow down or stop, then and only
then try something different."

And here's a related point. When you do
try something different, it should probably
be something similar, not a radical change
in approach. In other words, if 5 x 5 has
worked well for you, you might try 5 x 6,
6 x 6, or 5 x 5 followed by 1 x 3 and 1 x 1.

But don't change from 5 x 5 to 10 x 10
or 50 rep death sets or a three hour
pumping program.

Also, the best way to change things up is
often to use a new exercise, while keeping
the sets and reps the same. For example,
switch from back squats to front squats,
or from straight bar deadlifts to Trap Bar
deadlifts.

And remember this -- when you switch to
a new exercise or a new program, start
light and easy, and gradually add weight
to the bar. Make it progressive. Don't try
to max out and set new PR's the first day
in the saddle. See Dinosaur Training Secrets,
Vol. 3, for detailed advice on how to use old-
school progression systems for steady gains
without going stale or burning out.

Anyhow, that's the answer to a very common
question -- one that's become all the more
common because of the often overwhelming
amount and diversity of information on the
Interwebs.

Remember, if it's working for you, keep on
doing it -- and if it ain't broke, don't try to
fix it.

As always, thanks for reading and have a
great day. If you train today, make it a
good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. I mentioned Dinosaur Training Secrets,
Vol. 3. Go here to grab the little monster in
your choice of three formats:

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_03.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets3_kindle.html

PDF with electronic delivery

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets_vol3_digital.html

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 3. Thought for the Day: "Train with
confidence. Avoid doubters and nay-sayers.
Be resolute, and do what you need to do."
-- Brooks Kubik

If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 

For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html



The Complete List (Updated)


Brooks Kubik's Old School Strength Q & A is one of the newest additions to our ever-growing list of Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore.

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We now have 24 Kindle e-books for
you - so many that we put together
a special page for all of them.

Go here to check it out:

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

These are a great way to
set up a portable strength
training library, so that you
can read about the Iron
pretty much anywhere
and everywhere.

Note: You do NOT need a
Kindle reader to enjoy these
great books and courses.

Amazon offers a free app that
let's you read Kindle books on
any device.

You can find the app on every
sales page for every book in
the Kindle bookstore.


Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik


Dinosaur Style Powerlifting

Finishing a one-hand dumbbell swing with 151 pounds back in the original Dinosaur Dungeon.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Several readers have asked for
Dinosaur Style powerlifting
programs.

You can find plenty of powerlifting
workouts in Strength, Muscle and
Power - including a detailed look
at exactly how I trained when I
was competing in powerlifting
and bench press contests.

http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

There's also a terrific all-new
power rack training program
for powerlifters in The Dinosaur
Strength Training Archive, Vol.
1.

Why a power rack training
program?

Because power rack training
is far and away the best way
to increase your squat, bench
and deadlift.

It's how I added over 200 pounds
to my squat - and how I built my
bench press to the point where I
won 5 National Bench Press
contests.

Go here to grab the little monster:

Hard copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurtraining_archive.html

Kindle edition

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaurtrainingarchive_kindle01.html

As always, thanks for reading and
have a great day. If you train today,
make it a good one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik


Dinosaur Training Secrets

Old-school, Dino-style strength training traces its roots back to Arthur Saxon and other legendary strongmen of his era - which means that it's been building strength and muscle for over 100 years! 


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

In 2015 I began a new series of
courses titled Dinosaur Training
Secrets.

Each volume in the series covers
a different aspect of old-school,
Dino-sty;e strength training and
muscle building.

So far, I've done three courses
in the series - which means it's
probably time to hurry up and
do another one!

In the meantime, if you missed
them, start with Vol. 1. It covers
exercises, sets, reps and workouts,
and it will give you a ton of great
training advice.

It's available in hard copy, Kindle
and PDF:

Dinosaur Training Secrets,
Vol. 1. -
"Exercises, Workouts
and Training
Programs"

Kindle

http://brookskubik.com/dinosaursecrets01_kindle.html

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_secrets_01.html

PDF

See the list of PDF courses on our
products page:

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik





My Favorite Dumbbell Training Workout

 
John Grimek performing the alternate dumbbell press. This was one of Grimek's favorite exercises.



Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We've been getting a ton of questions
about dumbbell training and dumbbell
workouts, so I thought I'd share my
all-time favorite dumbbell workout
with you.

I used this 20 years ago, when I was
preparing to film The Lost Art of
Dumbbell Training.

It worked pretty well. I got up to doing
the two dumbbell clean and press with
a pair of 126 pound dumbbells, a one
hand clean and push press with a 151
pound dumbbell, a one hand swing with
a 151 pound dumbbell, and a two hand
clean and push press with a pair of 131
pound thick handled dumbbells.   Those
were done at a bodyweight of 225 or
so, and I was 40 or 41 years old.

I trained three times per week, alternating
between two workouts. Workout A was
nothing but squats. I did bottom position
squats in the power rack, and either worked
up to a top single, or worked up to 5, 10 or
20 singles with a little less weight.

That was all I did in Workout A. Nothing
but squats.

Workout B was the dumbbell program. On
the one arm exercises, I would do one set
with each arm at each weight. On the two
dumbbell exercises, I would do one set at
each weight.

I trained all singles. I started light, and
worked up in 10 pound jumps to my top
weight in each exercise. Of course, the
program would work fine with doubles,
triples, fives or any other number of
low to medium reps. Or you could
start with sets of five and work up
to singles. There are many ways to
do the job.

To keep from having to spend the whole
workout changing weights, I would do one
set of all the exercises for each weight, and
then add weight and repeat the process.

As the weight increased and I maxed out
on different exercises, I would drop them
out of the rotation. Thus, at the end, with
the very heaviest weights, I would do only
the one hand swing and the one hand clean.

I did the following exercises:

1. Two hand dumbbell clean and press
(with two dumbbells)

2. One hand dumbbell clean and press

3. One hand dumbbell swing

4. Two hand dumbbell clean and push
press (with two dumbbells)

5. One hand dumbbell clean and push
press

6. One hand dumbbell clean (optional)

And that was it. Five or six big exercises.
Fast, fun and furious -- and very effective.

I cover more dumbbell workouts in
Dinosaur Dumbbell Training -- in fact,
there's a total of 50 of them, along with
detailed instruction on how to perform
each exercise:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur_dumbbelltraining.html

Anyhow, if you're looking for something fun
and effective, give this workout a try. It
worked great for me.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

2.  My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day: "Old school
dumbbell training builds serious strength
and power. Try it and see!" -- Brooks Kubik

If you enjoyed this Blog post, you'll love my Dinosaur Training books and courses. You can get them in PDF and hard-copy editions at my website or in Kindle editions at Amazon. 


For a complete list of my Kindle books, go here: http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html