Sets and Reps for Power Zone Training

 
Paul Anderson finishing a heavy press. Anderson was a World and Olympic champion, and World record holder. In his prime, he was widely regarded as the strongest man in the world. Like all champions, Anderson specialized in training the Power Zones.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

We've been talking about Brad
Steiner's approach to training the
Power Zones - and I promised to
cover his ideas about sets and
reps for Power Zone Training.

So let's roll up our sleeves and
do it.

If you missed my previous emails,
Steiner defined the Power Zones
as:

1. The legs and hips

2. The back

3. The shoulder girdle

4. The chest area

For the legs and hips, Steiner
preferred:

1. Squats - full or parallel

2. Front squats

For sets and reps he liked the
following for both squats and
front squats:

For beginners - 1 or 2 x 12-15 or
a basic breathing squat program
consisting of 1 x 20 (for gaining
weight)

For intermediates - 2 or 3 x 10-12

For advanced trainees - 4 x 6 or
3 x 8 or 5 x 5

For working up to a maximum
single in the squat, Steiner liked:

Note - add weight on every set.

1 x 12

1 x 8

1 x 6

1 x 3

1 x 2

1 x 2

1 x 1

1 x 1

For the shoulders, Steiner liked the
standing press and the standing
press behind neck.

For sets and reps on pressing exercises,
he preferred:

For beginners - 2 or 3 x 8-10

For intermediates - 10/8/6, adding
weight on each set

For advanced trainees:

2 x 6

add weight and do 1 x 3

add weight and do 1 x 2-3

add weight and do 1 x 2

For working up to a maximum
single in the press, Steiner liked:

Note - add weight on every set.

1 x 6

1 x 5

1 x 3

1 x 2

1 x 2

1 x 1

1 x 1

1 x 1

We'll cover Steiner's suggested sets and
reps for chest and back training in
future emails - we're about out of space
in this one!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. For more about sets, reps, and
exercises for building strength and
muscle, grab Dinosaur Training
Secrets,
Vol. 1, 2 and 3.

They're available in your choice of hard-
copy, Kindle and PDF.

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day

"Hard work, heavy iron and old-
school
training programs will do
it every time."


- Brooks Kubik


BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:















Training the Power Zones

Philadelphia's Louis Abele built incredible strength and muscle mass by specializing on the Power Zones.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One quick note, and then we'll talk
iron.

1. A Very Big Thank You!

Our t-shirt sale ended at midnight
last night, and it was quite a
success.

I want to thank everyone who
stepped up and took action. We
appreciate it.

We're talking with our printer
today to place the order for all
the different shirts, and we'll
keep you posted about when
they will be printed and shipped.

It should be 2 to 3 weeks, but it
will depend on how many other
jobs are in front of us.

Again, to everyone who ordered a
shirt - THANK YOU!

2. Training the Power Zones.

Yesterday we talked about the
Power Zones.

That was Brad Steiner's term for
what he regarded as the four
most important areas of the body.

The areas to train as hard and
heavy as possible - with the goal
of developing each of them to the
absolute maximum.

The Power Zones are:

1. The legs and hips

2. The back

3. The shoulder girdle

4. The chest area

Steiner's preferred exercises for
training the Power Zones were
as follows.

For the legs and hips, Steiner
preferred:

1. Squats - full or parallel

2. Front squats

For the back, Steiner liked:

1. Barbell bent-over rowing

2. Power cleans

3. Power snatches

4. Bent-legged deadlifts

5. Stiff-legged deadlifts

6. High pulls - using either a clean
grip or a snatch grip

For the shoulders, Steiner
recommended:

1. Military press

2. Press behind neck

Note; Perform these in a standing
position, not seated.

For the chest, Steiner advocated:

1. Barbell bench press

2. Incline dumbbell press

Of course, you wouldn't use all of
these in one workout - or even in
one program. You'd pick three to six
movements, train them hard for a
while, and then replace some or all
of them with different exercises.

We'll cover sets and reps tomorrow.
Be looking for it.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. For much more about training
the Power Zones - and about building
Herculean strength and muscle mass
from head to toe - grab Strength,
Muscle and Power:

http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day

"Train for strength. Everything else
will follow." 


- Brooks Kubik

BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:















Reason No. 157 to Buy a Power Rack

 
There are plenty of good reasons to do power rack training - but here's one of the more unusual reasons to buy a power rack.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One quick note, and then I'll
give you reason no. 157 to buy
a power rack.

Last call for Dinosaur Training t-shirts!


1. Dino T-Shirts - Last Chance!

Today is the LAST DAY of our
big sale for Dinosaur t-shirts -
so if you haven't already grabbed
one, do it now:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-tshirt.html

2. Reason No. 157 to Buy a
Power Rack

One of our long-time Dinos
shared a good story about
his power rack.

Ten or twenty years ago, he
and his wife were at a Play It
Again Sports place - and they
saw a very big, industrial
strength, used power rack for
sale.

Actually, his wife saw it first.

"You should buy it," she said.

"Where would I put it?" he asked.

"Out in the garage."

So he bought it and took it home.

The problem was - the rack was
a little too tall to fit into the garage
(which had relatively low beams).

So he built an annex on one side
of the garage and moved the rack
in - and he's used it ever since.

Fast forward to not very long ago.

There's a big storm.

Tons of rain.

Super high winds.

And a huge branch breaks off the
next-door neighbor's ginormous
old oak tree - and it comes crashing
down on the garage!

But it hits the annex first - and the
big power rack - and the rack stops
the thing and holds it up - and keeps
it from crushing the garage.

The insurance agent couldn't believe
it when he saw it.

"If it hadn't been for that big gym
thing you have, you would have
lost the entire garage," he said.

So the moral of the story is:

When your wife spots a used power
rack and tells you to buy it, do
exactly what she says!

Reminder:

Grab a shirt - or a couple of
them:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-tshirt.html

They're great for power rack
workouts!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

The Power Zones

 
Reg Park built tremendous strength and enormous muscle mass by specializing on the Power Zones.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One quick note, and then we'll talk
training.

Today is the last day of our big t-shirt sale - so if you want one, place your order right now!


1. Last Chance for T-Shirts!

The big sale for our new Dinosaur
Training t-shirts ends today - and
we won't take any more shirt
orders after the sale is over.

So if you want one, go here and
grab it now:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-tshirt.html

If you have any questions, or
if you want the best rate for
shipping on an international
order, shoot me an email.

John Grimek in his greatest pose. At the time he won the Mr. America contest, and for a number of years before, Grimek trained exclusively on old-school weightlifting NOT on bodybuilding workouts.


2. The Power Zones

Brad Steiner was one of the most
popular Iron Game authors of the
1960's, 1970's and 1980's.

He wrote about basic exercises,
and old-school strength training.

He advocated hard work on the
BIG exercises, three times a week,
for about an hour a workout.

Steiner emphasized training the
Power Zones.

He said that by specializing on the
Power Zones, you could transform
yourself into a human Hercules.

What were the Power Zones?

Steiner described them as follows:

1. The legs and hips

2. The back

3. The shoulder girdle

4. The chest area

Steiner always taught his readers
to focus on these four areas.

To train them hard and heavy.

To train them progressively.

To aim for maximum development
in these four areas.

Tomorrow I'll talk a bit about how
Steiner trained these four areas. Be
looking for it.

In the meantime, don't forge to
grab yourself a couple of our new
Dinosaur Training t-shirts - and
remember, today's the last
day to
place your order:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-tshirt.html

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik



BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:

















Train for the Game of Life!

There's a reason why I do everything standing on my feet now - and why I train for a combination of strength, balance, coordination and athletic movement.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

One quick note and then we'll talk iron.

1. Two days Left!

Our big sale for Dinosaur Training t-shirts
ends at midnight on Tuesday - meaning,
tomorrow night.

In other words less than 48 hours.

Also referred to as: VERY SOON.

If you want to order one of our sharp-
looking new t-shirts, do it now. They
won't be available after the sale ends
tomorrow evening.

Go here to place your order:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-tshirt.html

If you have any questions, or you have
any trouble placing your order, shoot
me an email.

2. Training for the Game of Life

Here are some stats from the National
Council on Aging - taken from the U.S.
Center for Disease Control and
Prevention:

a. Every year, one out of four Americans
over the age of 65 suffers a slip and fall.

b. Every 11 seconds, an older adult is
treated in a hospital room for a slip
and fall; every 19 minutes, an older
adult dies from a fall.

c. Falls are the leading cause of non-
fatal injury among older adults.

d. Falls are the most common cause of
non-fatal, trauma-related hospital
admissions among older adults.

e. Every year, falls result in more than
2.8 million injuries treated in emergency
rooms - and of these, more than 800,000
require hospitalization - and 27,000
result in death.

f. In 2013, the total cost of fall-related
injuries was $34 billion.

g. As the population ages, the financial
toll for falls by older adults is expected
to reach $67.7 billion by 2020.

Many of us are either approaching or
past age 65 - and we need to start
thinking about how to avoid being
yet another statistic in the great slip
and fall epidemic.

The answer, of course, is pretty simple:

1. Do old-school, stand on your feet
strength training.

2. Train your legs, hips and back
extra hard.

3. In addition to your strength training,
do exercises that train balance and
stability.

4. Get out and walk - every single
day.

5. Don't do dumb stuff that leads to
injuries - because injuries affect your
balance and coordination - and that
causes falls.

6. Keep your weight under control.

7. If possible, learn to fall without
hurting yourself - and learn how to
get back up if you do fall.

Those are pretty simple, and you're
probably already doing some or all
of them.

But work them into your program.

Train for the game of life - because,
after all, we're talking about YOUR
life.

As always, thanks for reading. If you
train today, make it a good one.

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Here's the no. 1 book on effective
strength training for older Dinos:

http://www.brookskubik.com/grayhair_blackiron.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day

"The goal is strong, active and as
athletic as possible - at any age."


- Brooks Kubik


BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:















Dinosaur T-Shirts - Last Chance!


This is the design for our new Dinosaur Training t-shirts. They come in over a dozen different colors - so grab three - one for squatting, one for benching and one for deadlifting. 

The sale ends TODAY.

So if you like the design, and you want one, order it now:



http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-tshirt.html




The Little Gym that Beat the World (Part 2)

The legendary John Davis - six-time World Champion and two-time Olympic Gold Medal winner - trained at old-school, hole in the wall gyms.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk
iron.

1. Old Strength and Health
Mags

I have some good ones for sale -
right here - but they're going fast:

http://dinosaurtraining.blogspot.com/2017/08/rare-old-strength-magazines-list-no-9.html

2. Dinosaur Training T-Shirts

The sale ends next Tuesday, so
if you want a shirt, order it now:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-tshirt.html

After next Tuesday, we're going
to stop taking orders and let our
printer know how many shirts we
need in different sizes and colors.

After that, there won't be any more
shirts available until and unless we
do another printing. And if we do, it
will probably be with a different
design.

So if you want a shirt with the
current design, pls place your
order asap. This may be your
last chance.

3. The Little Gym that Beat the
World (Part 2)

The name of the place was The
South Philly Weightlifting Club.

It was a neighborhood gym on
the second floor of a garage.

The only source of heat was the
old, wood-burning stove. In the
winter, the lifters kept one barbell
close to the stove so they could
do their warm-up sets with a
barbell that didn't feel as cold
as ice.

After you finished your warm-ups,
you put the bar back by the stove
for the next guy to use when he
came in - and you continued your
workout with one of the cold bars.

But by then, after your warm-ups,
you could stand the cold.

In the summer, things were a bit
different.

The gym was so hot, it felt like you
were training inside a blast furnace.

The gym was spartan at best. There
were a few wooden lifting platforms,
some homemade wooden benches
and squat racks, a pull-up bar, and
some barbells and dumbbells.

The men trained on basic exercises.


Most of them practiced Olympic
weightlifting. Many of them also did
plenty of squats and bench presses.
They did lots of dumbbell pressing
and high pulls.

At the 1948 Olympic Games, six gold
medals were awarded in weightlifting.

Two of the gold medals went to men
from the South Philly Weightlifting
Club.

John Davis and Frank Spellman.

The little neighborhood gym had out-
lifted the world.

And that tells you something very
important about what it takes to be
a champion - and about the kind of
gyms that build a champion.

As always, thanks for reading and
have a great day. lf you train today,
make it a good one - and do an
extra rep or two in honor of the
South Philly Weightlifting Club!

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. Old-time lifters did plenty of stand
on your feet training - and I teach you
how to do it in The Dinosaur Military
Press and Shoulder Power Course.

It's available in your choice of hard-
copy, Kindle or PDF:

Hard-copy

http://www.brookskubik.com/militarypress_course.html

PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day

"Bare bones and basic builds strength
AND character."

- Brooks Kubik


BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:















The Little Gym that Beat the World (Part 1)

Old-school gyms were rugged, formidable places - and they built rugged, formidable men. Here's the true story of one of the very best of the old gyms.


Hail to the Dinosaurs!

Two quick notes, and then we'll talk
iron.

1. Old Strength and Health
Mags

I have some good ones for sale -
right here:

http://dinosaurtraining.blogspot.com/2017/08/rare-old-strength-magazines-list-no-9.html

2. Dinosaur Training T-Shirts

The sale ends next Tuesday, so
if you want a shirt, order it now:

http://www.brookskubik.com/dinosaur-tshirt.html

3. The Little Gym that Beat
the
World (Part 1)

We've been talking about old-school
gyms, and about basic, hole in the
wall places compared to the big,
fancy gyms that most people go
to.

So I thought I'd share a true story
about a very special gym.

The place is Philadelphia.

The time is 1940.

It's winter.

And here we go . . .

Two men huddled in front of an old
fashioned, wood-burning, cast iron
stove.

Each man wore two sweat suits, a
dark gray fisherman's knit hat, and
thick gloves.

One of them pulled his gloves off,
and held his hands over the stove.

"If my fingers were any colder,
they'd be icicles," he said.

The other man nodded in silent
agreement.

The first man reached down and
picked up a York Olympic barbell
that lay close to the stove.

"It's ready," he said.

The other man laughed softly.

"Meaning it's not frozen to the
floor," he said.

The first man nodded.

"Meaning it's not frozen to the
floor," he said.

He carried the barbell to the wooden
lifting platform, and performed five
quick reps in the clean and press.

"Your turn," he said.

The second man stepped onto the
platform and did the same five rep
warm-up.

The wind roared, and rattled against
the windows.

The winter snow forced its way in
through a small hole in the window
at the far end of the building.

The men paid it no attention.

They continued to train.

They gradually added wight to the
bar.

By now, under the heavy sweats, they
were actually feeling warm and loose.

A third man came into the gym.

"Where's the warm-up bar?" he
shouted.

The first two men unloaded the bar,
and one of them carried back to the
stove and placed it on the floor as
close as possible to the only source
of heat in the big room.

"Give it ten minutes," he said.

He went back to the lifting platform.

The other lifter was already loading
up another bar - a very cold bar -
and preparing to lift it.

That was the rule. You used the old
bar by the stove for your warm-up
sets, and then you switched to one
of the other bars - and put the
warm-up bar back by the stove
for the next guy who came in.

TO BE CONTINUED . . .

Yours in strength,

Brooks Kubik

P.S. If you like old-school training,
you'll love Strength, Muscle and
Power.

Especially the chapter on home
gym training - the chapter about
my island gym - and the chapter
about not making any excuses.

You can grab the little monster
right here:

http://www.brookskubik.com/strength_muscle_power.html

P.S. 2. My other books and courses are
right here at Dino Headquarters:

Hard-copy and PDF

http://www.brookskubik.com/products.html

Kindle

http://www.brookskubik.com/kindle.html

P.S. 2. Thought for the Day

"Gyms are supposed to be places
that make you strong, healthy and
tough. That's why chrome-plated
pleasure palaces don't cut it."


Brooks Kubik



BEFORE YOU LEAVE . . .

We have more than 25 Dinosaur Training books and courses in the Kindle bookstore - here are several of them - head on over and take a look at the others:















Rare Old Strength Magazines - List No. 9

Hail to the Dinosaurs!

I have a ton of duplicate books, courses and magazines about strength training, weightlifting, powerlifting, bodybuilding, physical culture, Iron Game history, boxing, wrestling, martial arts, diet,  nutrition, and related subjects, and I since I only need one copy of any particular item, I'm going to sell the rest of them.

And since we're going to be moving in the not too distant future, I'm looking for good homes for some of my one-of-a-kind items - and for some of my longtime friends from the bookshelves here in the Dinosaur Research Library.

Everything is first come, first served - meaning that the first person who shoots me an email about a given item. ("First" means "the first email in my inbox.)

So if you're interested in anything, do not delay. Shoot me an email and ask about availability. Include your shipping address so we can calculate shipping and handling for you. And be sure to tell me if you use PayPal. That's the easiest way to handle the payment.

All of these come from the world-famous Dinosaur Training Research Library. Thus, you'll have something great to read AND you'll be owning a true piece of Iron Game history.

My email is:

info@brookskubik.com




LIST NO. 9 - RARE STRENGTH BOOKS AND MAGAZINES

We're offering six back issues of Strength and Health from the early 1940's today. I have several copies of each, so I've priced them to go fast. Give yourself a treat (you know you deserve it) and grab all six issues. 




September 1941 Strength and Health

Features Rudy Gambacorta of Reverside New Jersey on the cover - doing an impressive muscle control called "the rope." 

Articles by Jules Bacon, Bob Hoffman, Gracie Bard, Gord Venables, Tony Terlazzo, Vic Tanny, Robert L. Jones and Sig Klein - including Klein's tribute to the legendary Coney Island Strongman, Warren Lincoln Travis. Plenty of great photos - including photos of John Grimek hard at work in the York foundry!

I have several issues of this magazine, all of them in good condition - so I'm pricing them to go fast.

PRICE: $10.00 plus shipping and handling.




November 1940 Strength and Health

Featuring coverman Louis Abele, one of the strongest and best built men in the world. Abele stood 5' 8" tall and weighed 218 pounds. He built himself up with plenty of heavy leg and back work, including 20 rep breathing squats with heavy weights and sets of 10 reps in the snatch with 235 pounds. He once said that after a heavy workout he was so sore that everything ached, including his teeth.

Had Abele not had the misfortune of competing against Steve Stanko and John Davis, he would have won the USA Senior National Championship many times - and might have gone on to be a World and Olympic Champion. 

Includes articles by Harry Paschall, Eddie Harrison, Bob Hoffman, Alton Eliason, Charles Tiffin, Sig Klein, Robert L. Jones, Steve Stanko, Gord Venables, Elmer Farnham, Dr. Walter C. LaBerge, and John Grimek. Tons of great photos, including photos of Ottley Coulter, John Grimek and Steve Stanko.

I have several issues of this magazine, all of them in good condition - so I'm pricing them to go fast.

PRICE: $10.00 plus shipping and handling.



May 1940 Strength and Health

Features Dick Falcon of Columbus, Ohio on the front cover - and includes a terrific inside cover photo of Chick Deutsch. 

Includes articles by Bob Hoffman, Dick Zimmerman, Dr. Walter C. LaBerge, Robert Strickland, Charles Tiffin, Ray Van Cleef, Wib Scharzberger, Harry Paschall, Gord Venables, Eddie Harrison, Elmer Farnham, and Norm Miller - along with a terrific article by John Grimek on muscle control.

Ray Van Cleef profiles Warren Lincoln Travis, and the article features some terrific photos of Travis doing some heavy support lifting with weights from his famous strongman act. You won't see these anywhere else. My favorite is the photo of Travis lifting the cannon, but the photo of Travis with the World's Largest Dumbbell is also pretty good. 

Includes tons of great photos, including a rare photo of New Zealand's Harold Cleghorn, who was rated as the top lifter in the British Empire. After the War, Cleghorn won the Heavyweight class in the British Empire Games (now the Commonwealth Games). John McCallum met him at the 1954 Commonwealth Games in Vancouver, and wrote a memorable article about Cleghorn and his training - you probably remember it from The Keys to Progress.
I have several issues of this magazine, all of them in good condition - so I'm pricing them to go fast.

PRICE: $10.00 plus shipping and handling.



November 1941 Strength and Health

Features Emil Bonnet of Los Angeles on the cover.

Includes articles by Henry Connelly, John Terpak, Bob Hoffman, Ray Van Cleef, Charles Tiffin, Tony Terlazzo, Reyam Sherman, Robert L. Jones, Vic Tanny, Gord Venables and Steve Stanko.

Plenty of great photos, including a bulked up Jack LaLanne (Yeah, I know - it's hard to believe) and an incredibly muscular Neil McClain. Look for them on page 23 and page 26. The photo of Robert David Brinker on page 27 is also pretty good - and the planche photos on page 17 will knock your socks off.

But the most incredible thing is the line drawing by Gord Venables (at page 14) showing Steve Stanko doing an absolutely amazing feat of strength - one that I do NOT suggest you try at home (or anywhere else).

This is a great isue to show what old-school training could do for a man - and to show what's possible in the way of all-natural, drug-free muscular development.

I have several issues of this magazine, all of them in good condition - so I'm pricing them to go fast.

PRICE: $10.00 plus shipping and handling.



January 1941 Strength and Health

The cover features Joe Mandall of Akron, Ohio, and World Champion, John Davis, who at that time held the World Record in the snatch and the clean and jerk.

Includes articles by John Grimek, Bob Hoffman, Dr. Frederick Tilney, Robert L. Jones, Dr. Walter C. LaBerge, Gord Venables, Charles Tifin, Elmer Farnham, Karo Whitfield, Gracie Bard and (get this) Eugene Sandow.

Includes some terific photos, including a remarkable photo of Charles Rigoulet setting aprofesional World Record in the clean and Jerk with 385 pounds - using a remarkable old-school barbell with huge globe weights at each end 0- and an extra, long, very springy bar. This photo is at page 5.

At page 30, there's a photo of a very young Frank Spellman when he first began training - and when you see it, you won't believe he went on to win the Olympic Gold Medal in 1948. I asked Frank about this photo once, and he laughed and said they chose him to make the other guy in the photo look good!

I have several issues of this magazine, all of them in good condition - so I'm pricing them to go fast. 

PRICE: $10.00 plus shipping and handling.



December 1945 Strength and Health 

Featuring Mike Dubel of Detroit on the cover.

Includes articles by Bob Hoffman, Gord Venables, Reyam Sherman, Dick Zimmerman, Harry Paschall, Lt. W. McClanahan, Pudgy Stockton, Tony Terlazo, and Steve Stanko. Terlazzo's article on barbell Men in the Service is terrific - as are the photos of homemade barbells and dumbbells servicemen around the world cobbled together from truck and railway wheels, and anything else they could find. There's also a terrific photo of Norma Wieland of Detroit with a big smile while she's deadlifting a wagon wheel barbell. Look for it at page 22.

I have several issues of this magazine, all of them in good condition - so I'm pricing them to go fast. 

PRICE: $10.00 plus shipping and handling.



Remember, everything is first come, first served, so if you see something you want, shoot me an email immediately. My email address is: 
info@brookskubik.com